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I have a while loop:

def setWorkDays(dayNameList):
            workDays = []
            while self.count > 0: #continue loop until all 5 work days have been filled or the loop breaks at the end 
                for day in dayNameList: #iterate over days, adding days to work days if they are not free days, AL days, preferred days, or free Saturdays 
                    if day in self.freeDays or day in self.alDays or (day == 'Saturday' and self.satOff is True):
                        continue
                    elif day in self.programDays:
                        workDays.append(day)
                        self.count -= 1
                    elif self.preferredDay is not None and day in self.preferredDay:
                        continue
                    else:
                        workDays.append(day)
                        self.count -= 1
                if self.preferredDay not in self.workDays: #if iteration completes, 5 work days have not been filled, and the preferred day has not been added, add the preferred day 
                    workDays.append(self.preferredDay)
                    self.count -=1
                return workDays

the idea behind the loop is that the second that self.count hits 0, the loop is terminated. This is the only function in which self.count is modified. Yet I'm getting strange results, where the loop appears to go on for at least 1 count too long, as the program is outputting -1 in some cases for self.count. Should this be happening? Shouldn't the while loop terminate the second self.count hits zero, or does it have to first finish the for loop? Should I be adding conditional logic after the self.count decrements that checks if self.count is zero and breaks if it is? That seems like the purpose of the while loop ...

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5  
The idea behind a while loop is that is checks a condition, executes the whole following block of code, then checks again, etc. –  Volatility Jan 9 '13 at 21:47
2  
Maybe it's a formatting error, but currently, this code would always return after only a single loop iteration due to the return at the end. –  lethal-guitar Jan 9 '13 at 21:48
1  
you have a nested for loop in the while loop. it is possible that you are decrementing self.count multiple times in the for loop on each iteration of the while loop. so if self.count was 1, and the for loop decremented self.count in two different iterations - you'd get a negative self.count. –  Mike Corcoran Jan 9 '13 at 21:52
1  
The check isn't done at each line; it's only done at the top of the loop. If you want to break out in the middle of the loop, use break. (If you return or raise to a handler outside the loop, that will also do it.) –  abarnert Jan 9 '13 at 21:53
1  
No, the only way is to check after every decrement. You could create a function which decrements count and raises an exception if count reaches 0, but that's kinda hacky. –  lethal-guitar Jan 9 '13 at 21:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A while loop doesn't automatically exit in mid-loop as soon as its condition is no longer true; it just checks the condition at the start of each loop. If you want to get out early, you need to break explicitly (or do something else non-local, like return from the function or raise to an except handler outside the loop).

It seems like what you're trying to do is get out of the for loop early, if self.count ever hits 0. There's really no way to do that directly. You have to check each time you decrement it.

However, you really don't need self.count at all. You decrement it exactly in the same places you append to workDays. So, just check whether you've got 5 of them yet. In other words, each self.count -= 1 becomes:

if len(workDays) >= 5: break

There is actually a way to do what (I think) you want in Python: use a generator instead of a list. If you yield each value instead of appending it to a list and then returning that list at the end, then you just stop iterating over the generator once you get 5 entries.

For example:

def setWorkDays(dayNameList):
    while self.count > 0: #continue loop until all 5 work days have been filled or the loop breaks at the end 
        for day in dayNameList: #iterate over days, adding days to work days if they are not free days, AL days, preferred days, or free Saturdays 
            if day in self.freeDays or day in self.alDays or (day == 'Saturday' and self.satOff is True):
                continue
            elif day in self.programDays:
                yield day
            elif self.preferredDay is not None and day in self.preferredDay:
                continue
            else:
                yield day
        if self.preferredDay not in self.workDays: #if iteration completes, 5 work days have not been filled, and the preferred day has not been added, add the preferred day 
            yield day

workDays = [setWorkDays(dayNameList) for _ in range(5)]

Often, you don't even really need the list, all you need to do is iterate over it. For that, you could do:

for workDay in (setWorkDays(dayNameList) for _ in range(5)):

Or:

for workDay in itertools.islice(setWorkDays(dayNameList), 5):

A lot of things that generators can do feel like magic until you understand them—which often means you shouldn't do them until you learn about generators. So, if this makes no sense to you, don't just pick it up and use it. But if it prompts you to learn how to write and use generator functions, great!

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Thanks for the thorough answer. I'll have to go with explicitly checking instead of using workDays length as a proxy for count though, because the program will eventually have other functions that decrement the count attribute. –  user1427661 Jan 9 '13 at 22:00
    
@user1427661: See the edited version. I don't expect you to understand how it works—but if you learn how it works, it may help you solve your real problem. –  abarnert Jan 9 '13 at 22:09

This seems to do what you need:

def setWorkDays(dayNameList):
     workDays = []
     for day in dayNameList:
         if day in self.freeDays or day in self.alDays or (
             day == 'Saturday' and self.satOff):
                 continue
         elif day in self.programDays:
             workDays.append(day)
             self.count -= 1
         elif self.preferredDay is not None and day in self.preferredDay:
             continue
         else:
             workDays.append(day)
             self.count -= 1
         if self.count <= 0:
              break
     else:
         if self.preferredDay not in self.workDays:
             workDays.append(self.preferredDay)
             self.count -=1
     return workDays
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The original loop can span multiple weeks, and this one can't. For the given sample code, that just means that, in any case where you'd return early with an incomplete answer, the original code would loop forever, which is an improvement. But if the OP's real code needs to do stuff across multiple weeks, that would be a different story. –  abarnert Jan 9 '13 at 22:03

A while loop in any language (that I know) doesn't work the way you were expecting.

In general a while loop has the format:

while <condition>:
  <code block>

The while loop checks the condition once per loop. It does not check the condition constantly. This means that the entirety of the code block would execute between each condition check, unless some control flow statement (such as continue, break, or return) executes during the code block.

In practice, this condition check once per loop has performance benefits (the computer doesn't have to constantly evaluate the condition) as well as limiting the cyclomatic complexity of a program.

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Your decrement several times self.count in your while loop.

The loop will only break at the beginning of the block. So what can happen is that self.count is positive at the beginning of the block and then decrements to a negative value in a single block.

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