Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
When is the `==` operator not equivalent to the `is` operator? (Python)

I am using Python 2.x.

My editor gives me a 'warning' underline when I compare my_var == None, but no warning when I use my_var is None.

I did a test in the Python shell and determined both are valid syntax, but my editor seems to be saying that my_var is None is preferred.

Is this the case, and if so, why?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by mgilson, Lev Levitsky, Kate Gregory, EdChum, t0mm13b Jan 10 '13 at 1:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
PEP 8 says somewhere that you should compare to singletons using is - python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/#programming-recommendations –  Volatility Jan 9 '13 at 22:11
2  
That poster is talking about Python 3, and my question is about Python 2.x. I am not sure if this is a big enough difference to warrant both remaining but I edited the question to include that just in case. –  Clay Wardell Jan 9 '13 at 22:30
    
I don't think this question is really a duplicate. The other was about == vs is in general, this one is about None in particular. –  I. J. Kennedy May 4 at 21:47
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

You can have custom classes where my_var == None will return True

e.g:

class Negator(object):
    def __eq__(self,other):
        return not other

thing = Negator()
print thing == None    #True
print thing is None    #False

is checks for object identity. There is only 1 object None, so when you do my_var is None, you're checking whether they actually are the same object (not just equivalent objects)

In other words, == is a check for equivalence (which is defined from object to object) whereas is checks for object identity:

lst = [1,2,3]
lst == lst[:]  # This is True since the lists are "equivalent"
lst is lst[:]  # This is False since they're actually different objects
share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean by overloading the == operator to always return True when compared to None? –  Clay Wardell Jan 9 '13 at 22:08
    
When does is None differ from == None? –  Blender Jan 9 '13 at 22:09
4  
@Blender In the case mentioned. __eq__ can be defined in any way, but the behavior of is can't be changed so easily. –  Lev Levitsky Jan 9 '13 at 22:10
2  
@LevLevitsky: One of the example uses of Mython was "extending the protocols so any operator can be overloaded, even is". After a comment on the lists, he changed that to, "… even is (but only if you're insane)." –  abarnert Jan 9 '13 at 22:19
1  
@abarnert -- I wasn't even aware that PEP 8 made a recommendation here. The point is that they're different operators that do different things. There might be cases where object == None actually is the correct idiom (though I can't think of any off the top of my head). You just need to know what you're doing. –  mgilson Jan 9 '13 at 22:24
show 4 more comments

is is generally preferred when comparing arbitrary objects to singletons like None because it is faster and more predictable. is always compares by object identity, whereas what == will do depends on the exact type of the operands and even on their ordering.

This recommendation is supported by PEP 8, which explicitly states that "comparisons to singletons like None should always be done with is or is not, never the equality operators."

share|improve this answer
add comment

PEP 8 defines that it is better to use the is operator when comparing singletons.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.