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I'm trying to get some experience in openGL, but now I'm facing "1.5" problems ;). The first problem / question is how can I get a rotation in two directions "simultaneously"? I want to draw a coordinate system which is movable on the x- and y-axis. But I'm only able to move on the x-axis or y-axis. I can't figure it out how to do both at the same time.

My other half problem is not really a problem but as you can see I'm binding my shaders all the time new when I move my mouse. Is there a better way how it could been done?

void GLWidget::mouseMoveEvent(QMouseEvent *event)
{
    differencePostition.setX(event->x() - lastPosition.x());
    differencePostition.setY(event->y() - lastPosition.y());

    shaderProgram.removeAllShaders();
    shaderProgram.addShaderFromSourceFile(QGLShader::Vertex, "../Vector/yRotation.vert");
    shaderProgram.addShaderFromSourceFile(QGLShader::Fragment, "../Vector/CoordinateSystemLines.frag");
    shaderProgram.link();
    shaderProgram.bind();
    shaderProgram.setAttributeValue("angle", differencePostition.x());

    //shaderProgram.release();
    //shaderProgram.addShaderFromSourceFile(QGLShader::Vertex, "../Vector/xRotation.vert");
    //shaderProgram.addShaderFromSourceFile(QGLShader::Fragment, "../Vector/CoordinateSystemLines.frag");
    //shaderProgram.link();
    //shaderProgram.bind();
    //shaderProgram.setAttributeValue("angle", differencePostition.y());

    updateGL();
}

void GLWidget::mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event)
{
    lastPosition = event->posF();
}

xRotation.vert

#version 330
in float angle;
const float PI = 3.14159265358979323846264;
void main(void)
{
    float rad_angle = angle * PI / 180.0;
    vec4 oldPosition = gl_Vertex;
    vec4 newPosition = oldPosition;
    newPosition.y = oldPosition.y * cos(rad_angle) - oldPosition.z * sin(rad_angle);
    newPosition.z = oldPosition.y * sin(rad_angle) + oldPosition.z * cos(rad_angle);
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * newPosition;
}

yRotation.vert

#version 330
in float angle;
const float PI = 3.14159265358979323846264;
void main(void)
{
    float rad_angle = angle * PI / 180.0;
    vec4 oldPosition = gl_Vertex;
    vec4 newPosition = oldPosition;
    newPosition.x = oldPosition.x * cos(rad_angle) + oldPosition.z * sin(rad_angle);
    newPosition.z = oldPosition.z * cos(rad_angle) - oldPosition.x * sin(rad_angle);
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * newPosition;
}
share|improve this question

Rotation in more than one direction at the same time requires a combination of matrices ( commonly called a general rotation matrix )

There are several sites that show how this matrix is generated if you are more interested.

As to your second problem, the shaders are usually initialized in the init section.

Example: http://doc-snapshot.qt-project.org/5.0/qtopengl/cube-mainwidget-cpp.html

share|improve this answer

You only need to call shaderProgram.bind(); every time before you want to draw an object with your shader. Loading and linking is usually only done once in the initialization of your programm. Only call shaderProgram.setAttributeValue your mouseMoveEvent method.

EDIT A quick way to solve your rotation problem is to write a shader that does both rotations one after the other. Add a second in variable and set both using the setAttributeValue method.

#version 330
in float angleX;
in float angleY;
const float PI = 3.14159265358979323846264;
void main(void)
{
    float rad_angle_x = angleX * PI / 180.0;
    vec4 oldPosition = gl_Vertex;
    vec4 newPositionX = oldPosition;
    newPositionX.y = oldPosition.y * cos(rad_angle_x) - oldPosition.z * sin(rad_angle_x);
    newPositionX.z = oldPosition.y * sin(rad_angle_x) + oldPosition.z * cos(rad_angle_x);

    float rad_angle_y = angleY * PI / 180.0;
    vec4 newPositionXY = newPositionX;
    newPositionXY.x = newPositionX.x * cos(rad_angle_y) + newPositionX.z * sin(rad_angle_y);
    newPositionXY.z = newPositionX.z * cos(rad_angle_y) - newPositionX.x * sin(rad_angle_y);
    gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * newPositionXY;
}

This way you don't need to know matrix multiplications.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh ok. I would never have came up with that shader ;) thx. But I other thing. I already bind shader in my initializeGL() methode because I want to draw first my coordinate system lines before i start rotating. – JumbleGee Jan 10 '13 at 23:37
    
maybe I'm thinking to far ahead but later i want to load new shaders to draw stuff and then i can't use my initialize method anymore. – JumbleGee Jan 10 '13 at 23:52
    
You can load and link all your shaders in initializeGL, but bind() them just before you draw your object. For your coordinate system you probably want to use a different shader anyway, since its never rotated. Create one shader as above and one for your coordinate system lines and later on the other ones for your different looking objects. – philipp Jan 15 '13 at 10:49

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