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I'm looking to bulk rename files in the current directory only and remove certain strings from the end of file names.

Sample:

foo-bar-(ab-4529111094).txt
foo-bar-foo-bar-(ab-189534).txt
foo-bar-foo-bar-bar-(ab-24937932201).txt

the output should look like this:

foo-bar.txt
foo-bar-foo-bar.txt
foo-bar-foo-bar-bar.txt

I want to remove the string -(ab-2492201) at the end of each file name knowing that the digits can vary in length.

A Perl regex is preferred over modules and without using any utilities and for bash oneliner command is highly preferred.

How to accomplish that in both Perl and Bash Shell on Linux? interested to know both solutions.

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Why do you not want to use any Perl modules? –  Borodin Jan 9 '13 at 22:40
    
to make it portable on multiple machines after inserting the code inside my main script, so not every machine will have to install modules dependencies. –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 23:06
    
There are very many perl "core" modules that should be available with any standard Perl installation. Once of them is File::Find, but it seems that isn't required for your problem. –  Borodin Jan 9 '13 at 23:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In bash, you could write something like:

for file in *-\(ab-[0-9]*\)*; do
    newfile="${file/-(ab-[0-9]*)/}"
    mv "$file" "$newfile"
done
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Worked Perfectly like i wanted while other solutions didn't, Saved my time, Thank you so much! –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 23:11

Try:

$ rename 's/-\(ab-\d+\)(?=\.txt$)//' *.txt

There's a rename command written in Perl. Its first argument is Perl code describing how to transform a filename. You could use the same s/// command in your own Perl program or one-liner.

If that doesn't work, try prename instead of rename; there's a different, non-Perl-based, rename command installed on some systems, in which case the Perl one may be called prename.

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Didn't work mate, but i'm still working on it, Thanks –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 23:02
    
Odd. I just created files with the exact names as in your question then pasted in the above rename command and it worked fine. What happened when you tried it? Was there any error message? If you put the -v option in the rename command, does that give any output? –  Smylers Jan 10 '13 at 0:11
1  
There is apparently more than one command called "rename"; some Linux distributions come with a non-perl version that works differently. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/22577767/… –  Arnon Weinberg Jan 13 at 3:22
    
Arnon Weinberg: Good point, thanks. Answer updated to reflect that. –  Smylers Jan 13 at 9:10

When you say under the current directory, do you mean in the current directory, or anywhere in or beaneath the current directory and its descendants?

File::Find is a simple way to do the latter, and is a core module so won't need installing. Like so:

use strict;
use warnings;

use autodie;

use File::Find;

find(\&rename, '.');

sub rename {
  return unless -f;
  my $newname = $_;
  return unless $newname =~ s/-\(ab-[0-9]+\)(\.txt)$/$1/i;
  print "rename $_, $newname\n";
}

Update

This program will rename all the files with the given filename pattern only within the current directory.

Note that the initial open loop is there only to create sample files for renaming.

use strict;
use warnings;

use autodie;

open my $fh, '>', $_ for qw(
  foo-bar-(ab-4529111094).txt
  foo-bar-foo-bar-(ab-189534).txt
  foo-bar-foo-bar-bar-(ab-24937932201).txt
);

for (glob '*.txt') {
  next unless -f;
  my $newname = $_;
  next unless $newname =~ s/-\(ab-[0-9]+\)(\.txt)$/$1/i;
  print "rename $_, $newname\n";
  rename $_, $newname;
}

output

rename foo-bar-(ab-4529111094).txt, foo-bar.txt
rename foo-bar-foo-bar-(ab-189534).txt, foo-bar-foo-bar.txt
rename foo-bar-foo-bar-bar-(ab-24937932201).txt, foo-bar-foo-bar-bar.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Current directory one level only, no subdirectories. I will try that, Thanks –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 22:48
    
This code will descend into subdirectories and is not what you want. –  Borodin Jan 9 '13 at 23:04
    
alright, Thanks for your time bro –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 23:07
1  
I have added a solution to rename files only in the current directory. –  Borodin Jan 9 '13 at 23:16
    
I will use that as well, Thanks for the update –  SilverShadow Jan 10 '13 at 5:42

A simpler, shorter (better ? :) ) rename regex :

rename 's@-\(.*?\)@@' foo*.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
Will try it, Thanks :)) –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 22:49
    
didn't work, sorry, please note that the string "foo" at the start of file names could be anything like multiple words separated by a dash - –  SilverShadow Jan 9 '13 at 23:08
    
What @sputnick wrote will work with anything at the start of the filename, so long as it then has a hyphen, an opening paren, and (some point later) a closing paren. Did you try creating the exact filenames you mention in your question and see if it works on those? –  Smylers Jan 10 '13 at 6:38

check this:

ls -1 | nawk '/foo-bar-/{old=$0;gsub(/-\(.*\)/,"",$0);system("mv \""old"\" "$0)}'

> ls -1 foo*
foo-bar-(ab-4529111094).txt
foo-bar-foo-bar-(ab-189534).txt
foo-bar-foo-bar-bar-(ab-24937932201).txt

> ls -1 | nawk '/foo-bar-/{old=$0;gsub(/-\(.*\)/,"",$0);system("mv \""old"\" "$0)}'

> ls -1 foo*
foo-bar-foo-bar-bar.txt
foo-bar-foo-bar.txt
foo-bar.txt
> 

For detailed explanation check here

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