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I have programmed in Microsoft Small Basic in the past, which can have arrays like this:

Array[1][1] = "Hello"
Array[1][2] = "Hi"
Array[1][2] = "Hey"

Now, in Javascript, I know how to create a single array (var Array = New Array()) but are there any array types like the ones above?

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3  
Array elements may be numbers, strings, objects ... or arrays. Just stack 'em up. BTW prefer var array = []; to var array = new Array(); – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 22:24
    
What does "I have some small basic" mean? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 22:25
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Presumably "I have used a little BASIC in the past." – cdhowie Jan 9 '13 at 22:26
    
@cdhowie: Sure, were that valid BASIC syntax. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 22:26
    
That is "Small Basic". A programming language – Zock77 Jan 9 '13 at 22:33

There are no true multidimensional arrays in JavaScript. But you can create an array of arrays like you have done.

JavaScript's arrays are just objects with a special length property and a different prototype chain.

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Thanks! Thats all I needed to know. – Zock77 Jan 9 '13 at 22:25
    
"Small Basic" is a programming language. – Zock77 Jan 9 '13 at 22:27
    
Sorry. It needed some clarification :) – Zock77 Jan 9 '13 at 22:28

Yes, you need to create an array of arrays:

var x = new Array(3);
x[0] = new Array(3);
x[1] = new Array(3);
x[2] = new Array(3);

x[0][0] = "Hello";
etc.

Remember that indexing is zero-based.

Edit

Or:

var x=[];
x[0] = [];
x[1] = [];
x[2] = [];
...
x[0][0] = "Hello";

etc.
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1  
Yuk @ new Array – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 22:28
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I think it's fine if used for the behaviour of setting the length. If they were empty, [] would definitely be better. – alex Jan 9 '13 at 22:28
    
@alex: It's pretty rare to need to set an array length beforehand. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 22:29
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I do it often, generally in conjunction with join(). – alex Jan 9 '13 at 22:31

You can achieve this:

var o = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]];

Also you can use the fact that objects in javascript are dictionaries:

var o;
o["0"] = {'0':1, '1':2, '1':3};
var x = o["0"]["1"]; //returns 2
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The easiest way would be to just declare an array, and initialize it with a bunch of other arrays. For example:

var mArray = [
  [1,2,3],
  [4,5,6]
  ];

window.alert(mArray[1][1]); //Displays 5

As others have pointed out, this is not actually a multi-dimentional array in the standard sense. It's just an array that happens to contain other arrays. You could just as easily have an array that had 3 other arrays, an int, a string, a function, and an object. JavaScript is cool like that.

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You can create arrays statically in JS like this:

var arr = [
   [1, 2, 3, 4], 
   [8, 6, 7, 8]
];

Note that since this is not a true "multidimentional array", just an "array of arrays" the "inner arrays" do not have to be the same length, or even the same type. Like so:

var arr = [
   [1, 2, 3, 4], 
   ["a", "b"]
];
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