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I would like to parse USA presidents on the "List of Presidents of the United States" wiki page.

I can do this with a bunch of XPath and loops. But SAx parsing is so fast and I would like to learn how to implement that.

The Nokogiri document gave me an HTML SAX parsing example:

class MyDoc < Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Document
 def start_element name, attributes = []
   puts "found a #{name}"
 end
end

parser = Nokogiri::HTML::SAX::Parser.new(MyDoc.new)
parser.parse(File.read(ARGV[0], 'rb'))

But which methods do I use to define all the HTML elements and their content that I want to grab?

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2  
SAX parsing isn't appreciably faster, but it allows you to read huge files, larger than practical with regular DOM parsing. DOM parsing is much more flexible and makes it easy to do multiple searches, and manipulate the DOM. –  the Tin Man Jan 9 '13 at 22:46
    
@theTinMan thanks for the explanation, I have couple of thousands of html files that I would like to parse. I was trying to keep the question simple and easy. –  SHUMAcupcake Jan 9 '13 at 22:49
1  
If the files fit into your host's memory one-by-one, then use DOM parsing. It's a LOT easier. –  the Tin Man Jan 9 '13 at 22:51
    
@theTinMan - Cool. But I still want to learn how to do this. –  SHUMAcupcake Jan 10 '13 at 15:04
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

With SAX, you have to define callback methods in your parser for each 'event'. You have to keep track of state yourself. It is very crude. For example, to get president names from the page, you can do this:

class MyDoc < Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Document
  def start_element name, attributes = []
    if name == "li"
      @inside_li = true
    end
  end

  def characters(chars)
    if @inside_li
     puts "found an <li> containing the string '#{chars}'"
    end
  end

  def end_element name
    if name == "li"
      puts "ending #{name}"
      @inside_li = false
    end
  end
end

The above can be thought of as the rough equivalent of the statement:

doc.xpath('//li').map(&:text)

Which starts with the following output:

ending li
found an <li> containing the string 'Grover Cleveland'
ending li
found an <li> containing the string 'William McKinley'
ending li
found an <li> containing the string 'Theodore Roosevelt'

So far so good, However, it also outputs a lot of cruft, ending with:

found an <li> containing the string 'Disclaimers'
ending li
found an <li> containing the string 'Mobile view'
ending li
found an <li> containing the string '
                        '
found an <li> containing the string '
                    '
ending li
found an <li> containing the string '
                        '
found an <li> containing the string '
                    '
ending li

So to make this more precise and not get the li elements you don't care about, you'd have to keep track of which container elements you are in by adding more if clauses to start_element, characters, etc. And if you have nested elements of the same name, you'll have to keep track of counters yourself, or implement a stack to push and pop the elements you see. It gets VERY messy very fast.

SAX is best for filters where you don't care about the DOM, you're just doing some basic transformations.

Instead, consider using a single XPath statement, such as

doc.xpath("//table[contains(.//div, 'Presidents of the United States')]//ol/li").map(&:text)

This says "Find the table which contains a div with the words 'Presidents of the United States' and return the text from all the ordered list items within it". This can be done in SAX, but it would be a lot of messy code.

Output of the above XPath:

["George Washington", "John Adams", "Thomas Jefferson", "James Madison", "James Monroe", "John Quincy Adams", "Andrew Jackson", "Martin Van Buren", "William Henry Harrison", "John Tyler", "James K. Polk", "Zachary Taylor", "Millard Fillmore", "Franklin Pierce", "James Buchanan", "Abraham Lincoln", "Andrew Johnson", "Ulysses S. Grant", "Rutherford B. Hayes", "James A. Garfield", "Chester A. Arthur", "Grover Cleveland", "Benjamin Harrison", "Grover Cleveland", "William McKinley", "Theodore Roosevelt", "William Howard Taft", "Woodrow Wilson", "Warren G. Harding", "Calvin Coolidge", "Herbert Hoover", "Franklin D. Roosevelt", "Harry S. Truman", "Dwight D. Eisenhower", "John F. Kennedy", "Lyndon B. Johnson", "Richard Nixon", "Gerald Ford", "Jimmy Carter", "Ronald Reagan", "George H. W. Bush", "Bill Clinton", "George W. Bush", "Barack Obama"]
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thank you @Mark Thomas for you awesome answer –  SHUMAcupcake Jan 11 '13 at 2:45
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