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I need to transform data structures from a list of arrays into a tree-like one. I know the depth of the tree before I start processing the data, but I want to keep things flexible so I can re-use the code.

So I landed upon the idea of generating a subref on the fly (from within a Moose-based module) to go from array to tree. Like this (in a simplified way):

use Data::Dump qw/dump/;

sub create_tree_builder {
     my $depth = shift;
     return eval join '', 'sub { $_[0]->{$_[', 
                           join(']}->{$_[', (1..$depth)),
                          ']} = $_[',  $depth + 1 , '] }'; 
}


my $s = create_tree_builder(5);
my $tree = {};

$s->($tree, qw/one two three four five/, 'a value');

print dump $tree;

# prints
#  {
#     one => { two => { three => { four => { five => "a value" } } } },
#  }

This opened up worlds to me, and I'm finding cool uses for this process of eval-in a parametrically generated string into a function all over the place (clearly, a solution in search of problems).

However, it feels a little too good to be true, almost.

Any advice against this practice? Or suggestion for improvements?

I can see clearly that eval-ing arbitrary input might not be the safest thing, but what else?

Follow up

Thanks for all the answers. I used amon's code and benchmarked a bit, like this:

use Benchmark qw(:all) ;

$\ = "\n";

sub create_tree_builder {
 my $depth = shift;
 return eval join '', 'sub { $_[0]->{$_[', 
               join(']}->{$_[', (1..$depth)),
              ']} = $_[',  $depth + 1 , '] }'; 
}


my $s = create_tree_builder(5);

$t = sub {
$_[0] //= {};

    my ($tree, @keys) = @_;
    my $value = pop @keys;

    $tree = $tree->{shift @keys} //= {} while @keys > 1;
    $tree->{$keys[0]} = $value;
};


cmpthese(900000, {
        'eval'  => sub { $s->($tree, qw/one two three four five/, 'a value') },
    'build' => sub { $t->($tree, qw/one two three four five/, 'a value') },

});

The results are clearly in favour of building the tree, not of the eval'ed factory:

            Rate build  eval
build  326087/s    --  -79%
eval  1525424/s  368%    -- 

I'll admit I could have done that before. I'll try with more random trees (rather than assigning the same element over and over) but I see no reason that the results should be different.

Thanks a lot for the help.

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@amon Thanks for the edit - I accidentally deleted the brace in trying to fit in the window (it looked OK in the editor) –  simone Jan 9 '13 at 23:33
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is very easy to write a generalized subroutine to build such a nested hash. It is much simpler that way than writing a factory that will produce such a subroutine for a specific number of hash levels.

use strict;
use warnings;

sub tree_assign {

  # Create an empty tree if one was not given, using an alias to the original argument
  $_[0] //= {};

  my ($tree, @keys) = @_;
  my $value = pop @keys;

  $tree = $tree->{shift @keys} //= {} while @keys > 1;
  $tree->{$keys[0]} = $value;
}

tree_assign(my $tree, qw/one two three four five/, 'a value');

use Data::Dump;
dd $tree;

output

{
  one => { two => { three => { four => { five => "a value" } } } },
}
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1  
Initializing it via an alias is very clever, and its a good flag that this should be an object. The while loop would be simpler and faster if it were while( @keys > 1 ). –  Schwern Jan 9 '13 at 23:56
    
@Schwern: Point taken - thanks. I have modified it in the spirit of your suggestion. –  Borodin Jan 10 '13 at 0:36
    
@Schwern: Sorry - tbh I hadn't noticed your edit and just modified and reposted my own code. I've replaced your comment. –  Borodin Jan 10 '13 at 0:49
    
Ahh, no worries. –  Schwern Jan 10 '13 at 0:51
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Why this might be a bad idea

  1. Maintainability.

    Code that is eval'd has to be eval'd inside the programmers head first– not always an easy task. Essentially, evaling is obfuscation.

  2. Speed.

    eval re-runs the perl parser and compiler, before normal execution resumes. However, the same technique can be used to gain start-up time by deferring compilation of subroutines until they are needed. This is not such a case.

  3. There is more than one way to do it.

    I like anonymous subroutines, but you don't have to use an eval to construct them. They are closures anyway. Something like

    ...;
    return sub {
      my ($tree, $keys, $value) = @_;
      $#$keys >= $depth or die "need moar keys";
      $tree = $tree->{$keys->[$_]} for 0 .. $depth - 1;
      $tree->{$keys->[$depth]} = $value;
    };
    

    and

    $s->($tree, [qw(one two three four five)], "a value");
    

    would do something suprisingly similar. (Actually, using $depth now looks like a design error; the complete path is already specified by the keys. Therefore, creating a normal, named subroutine would probably be best.)

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3  
Don't forget security! Every eval STRING is a security hole waiting to happen, even if you really really checked it really, everyone after you has to recheck it. And some maintenance programmer in the future might not be so careful. –  Schwern Jan 9 '13 at 23:40
    
Isn't there a speed hit inherent in looping down the keys? That's what I was trying to avoid by compiling the sub once (as the object is created) and avoiding the loop forevermore. –  simone Jan 9 '13 at 23:57
3  
@simone Perl has to walk down the hash no matter what. Hard coding the keys would be a little faster, but only because it happens inside Perl in C. amon is doing the same thing you were, just spelled out in Perl and without the eval. Both are O($depth). The real performance boost is to instead do my $subtree = $tree->{one}{two}{three}{four} and hold onto $subtree. Then do $subtree->{$key} = $value a bunch. –  Schwern Jan 10 '13 at 0:02
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Understanding what the OP is doing a little better based on their comments, and riffing on Borodin's code, I'd suggest an interface change. Rather than writing a subroutine to apply a value deep in a tree, I'd write a subroutine to create an empty subtree and then work on that subtree. This allows you to work efficiently on the subtree without having to walk the tree on every operation.

package Root;

use Mouse;

has root =>
  is    => 'ro',
  isa   => 'HashRef',
  default => sub { {} };

sub init_subtree {
    my $self = shift;
    my $tree = $self->root;

    for my $key (@_) {
        $tree = $tree->{$key} //= {};
    }

    return $tree;
}

my $root = Root->new;
my $subtree = $root->init_subtree(qw/one two three four/);

# Now you can quickly work with the subtree without having
# to walk down every time.  This loop's performance is only
# dependent on the number of keys you're adding, rather than
# the number of keys TIMES the depth of the subtree.
my $val = 0;
for my $key ("a".."c") {
    $subtree->{$key} = $val++;
}

use Data::Dump;
dd $root;
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Data::Diver is your friend:

use Data::Diver 'DiveVal', 'DiveRef';
my $tree = {};

DiveVal( $tree, qw/one two three four five/ ) = 'a value';

# or if you hate lvalue subroutines:
${ DiveRef( $tree, qw/one two three four five/ ) } = 'a value';

use Data::Dump 'dump';
print dump $tree;
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