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This is a very basic memory address question that I have:

Here is my snippet:

int *i = &a[0];
printf("ptr i = %p, i = %x, (i+1) = %p, (i+1) = %x\n", i, i, i+1, i+1);

the output is the following:

ptr i = 0x7fff5fbff700, i = 5fbff700, (i+1) = 0x7fff5fbff704, (i+1) = 5fbff704

This is a 32bit kernel.

What I really don't get is the following:
Address 0x7fff5fbff700 and Address 0x7fff5fbff704 are supposed to differ by 32bits or 4 bytes.

If I consider each 'element' in the address 0x7fff5fbff700 as 1 byte, then yes, I can see how the two address differ by 4bytes, but if that is the case then the address 0x7fff5fbff704 would be 12*4 = 48bytes . How is that even possible??

I ran it in Linux and this is what I get:

ptr i = 0xffff82cc, i = ffff82cc, (i+1) = 0xffff82d0, (i+1) = ffff82d0

If I try to print (i+1)-1, it always gives 0x1

but I don't get how 0xffff 82cc and 0xffff 82d0 differ by 32bits or 4 bytes!

0xffff82cc = FFFF 1000 0010 1010 1010
0xffff82d0 = FFFF 1000 0010 1011 0000

Please explain

share|improve this question
    
don't even know what that means...what does that indicate? – user999755 Jan 10 '13 at 0:08
3  
thanks...I've accepted answers to my earlier questions...i kept thanking the users who've replied...didnt realize i should have upvoted or accepted..thanks – user999755 Jan 10 '13 at 0:12
2  
Your binary values are wrong btw. 82cc = 1000 0010 1100 1100 and 82d0 = 1000 0010 1101 0000 – JasonD Jan 10 '13 at 0:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

"This is a 32bit kernel."

No it isn't. Your pointers are 64-bit, so you clearly can not run a 32-bit kernel. Try typing uname -a, and it should show you x86-64 somewhere in the name. In a 32-bit kernel, a pointer would never be more than 8 hex-digits, your values are 12 = 48 bits long. Unless you have a 48-bit processor that no one else has heard of, it probably is 64-bit processor.

The difference between your pointers are 4 bytes:

 0x7fff5fbff704
-0x7fff5fbff700
---------------
 0x000000000004

Same applies to your d0-cc example, it is 4 bytes apart.

Hexadecimal math works pretty much the same as decimal math, except the digits are 0123456789abcdef, representing the values 0..15 decimal. So, for example 3 + 7 = a, a + 1 = b, a + a = 14. So d0-cc, if start by removing c0 from d0, we have 10-c left to calculate. That's 16-12 in decimal, and it makes 4.

share|improve this answer

It's pretty simple. An address points to a byte in memory. Add 1 to the address and you get the address to the next byte in memory.

Pointers know the size of the value they're pointing to, so when you add 1 to an int* it actually increments the address contained by 4 (to cater for a 32-bit (4-byte) integer).

So 0x7fff5fbff700 is the address of a particular byte (or in the case of an int* a 32-bit int). 0x7fff5fbff704 = 0x7fff5fbff700 + 4, so 0x7fff5fbff704 points to the 4th byte (or the next 32-bit int) after the first one.

Likewise, 0xffff82d0 = 0xffff82cc + 4 so the addressed locations are 4 bytes (32 bits) apart.

A diagram might help here. Think of memory as a big list of bytes, each with their own address. So a small portion of memory looks something like (where each of the cells in the grid is one bit, and the addresses of the bytes are to the right):

|               |
|               |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff6ff
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff700
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff701
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff702
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff703
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff704
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | |   <-  0x7fff5fbff705
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|               |
|               |

So, in your code the int pointer with value 0x7fff5fbff700 points to ` 32-bit int which is stored in memory locations 0x7fff5fbff700, 0x7fff5fbff701, 0x7fff5fbff702 and 0x7fff5fbff703. That's 4 bytes for a total of 32 bits.

When you add 1 to the pointer, it actually increments the address by 4 so the pointer then stores the address of the firxt byte of the next 32-bit integer (0x7fff5fbff704).

share|improve this answer
    
@DanielFischer - Thanks. Fixed. – Andrew Cooper Jan 10 '13 at 0:24

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