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I am using Moq to verify if a method is being called in my unittest. In this specific case I want to test if the method under test logs an Error through log4net. The problem is, this can be done by either calling log.Error or log.ErrorFormat. Either is fine.

How can I verify this though? I only know how to verify that they have both been called.

var logMock = new Mock<ILog>();

var myClass = new MyClass(logMock.Object);

myClass.MyMethod();

logMock.Verify(log => log.Error(It.IsAny<object>()));
logMock.Verify(log => log.ErrorFormat(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<object>()));

Now that I think of it, they both have a bunch of overloads, I don't mind if any of the overloads are called either (I'm starting to doubt this is a good test).

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: I just thought of something nasty:

try
{
    logMock.Verify(log => log.Error(It.IsAny<object>()));
}
catch (Moq.MockException ex)
{
    logMock.Verify(log => log.ErrorFormat(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<object>()));
}

Maybe I can wrap this in some kind of extension method... e.g. VerifyAny.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could register a callback for each valid error method that sets a flag:

// Arrange
bool errorFlag = false;
logMock
    .Setup(l => l.Error(It.IsAny<object>()))
    .Callback((object o) => errorFlag = true);

/* repeat setup for each logMock method */

// Act
myClass.MyMethod();

// Assert
Assert.IsTrue(errorFlag);

Of course, this will still be tedious if you have many overloads to cover.

EDIT: And for fun, here's an extension method for Mock<T>.VerifyAny:

public static class MockExtensions
{
    public static void VerifyAny<T>(this Mock<T> mock, params Expression<Action<T>>[] expressions)
        where T: class
    {
        List<MockException> exceptions = new List<MockException>();
        bool success = false;
        foreach (var expression in expressions)
        {
            try
            {
                mock.Verify(expression);
                success = true;
                break;
            }
            catch (MockException ex)
            {
                exceptions.Add(ex);
            }
        }

        if (!success)
        {
            throw new AggregateException("None of the specified methods were invoked.", exceptions);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

[TestMethod]
public void FooTest()
{
    Mock<IFoo> fooMock = new Mock<IFoo>();
    fooMock.Object.Bar1();

    fooMock.VerifyAny(
        f => f.Bar1(),
        f => f.Bar2());
}
share|improve this answer
    
My version of VerifyAny was about the same except that I didn't think of the type constraint and collecting the exceptions. The usage is actually a bit cleaner than the CallBack approach. Or is the catching of exceptions like that a bad idea? Hmmm.... –  Matthijs Wessels Jan 10 '13 at 0:51
    
@MatthijsWessels Catching expected exceptions like that feels a little dirty, but for a unit test project I wouldn't worry about the performance too much. Perhaps it would be better to have a Mock<T>.SetupAny method instead that injects the callbacks and returns a bool. –  Scott Wegner Jan 10 '13 at 1:00

if you are specifically testing that a specific error was logged, why not have 2 tests, one that ensure that log.Error is called and one that ensure that log.ErrorFormat is called, I am assuming that you can control which one is called based on the input.

if you still wanna verify one or the other, you can just use this approach, it does exactly what you need:

Verify that either one method or the other was invoked in a unit test

share|improve this answer
    
The requirement for MyClass is that it logs an Error level log message. Error, ErrorFormat and their overloads all do that. It doesn't matter for me which one is used. The CallBack approach as specified in the answer you linked looks like it can do what I want. Although now I'm doubting between Scott Wegner's VerifyAll or the CallBacks. –  Matthijs Wessels Jan 10 '13 at 0:55

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