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This is more a style question than anything.

When writing queries, I always find myself checking if the result of the query is blank, and it seems - I dunno, overly verbose or wrong in some way.

EX.

def some_action
  @product = Product.where(:name => params[:name]).first
end

if there is no product with the name = params[:name], I get a nil value that breaks things.

I've taken to then writing something like this

def some_action
  product = Product.where(:name -> params[:name])
  @product = product if !product.blank?
end

Is there a more succinct way of handling nil and blank values? This becomes more of a headache when things rely on other relationships

EX.

def some_action
  @order = Order.where(:id => params[:id]).first
  # if order doesn't exist, I get a nil value, and I'll get an error in my app
  if !@order.nil?
    @products_on_sale = @order.products.where(:on_sale => true).all
  end
end

Basically, is there something I haven;t yet learned that makes dealing with nil, blank and potentially view breaking instance variables more efficient?

Thanks

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+1 for "blank checks" –  andrewdotnich Jan 10 '13 at 0:59
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2 Answers

If its just style related, I'd look at Rails' Object#try method or perhaps consider something like andand.

Using your example, try:

def some_action
  @order = Order.where(:id => params[:id]).first
  @products_on_sale = @order.try(:where, {:onsale => true}).try(:all)
end

or using andand:

def some_action
  @order = Order.where(:id => params[:id]).first
  @products_on_sale = @order.andand.where(:onsale => true).andand.all
end
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Very interesting, two methods I had not seen before. Awesome, thanks! –  Squadrons Jan 10 '13 at 1:40
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Well even if you go around "nil breaking things" in your controller, you'll still have that issue in your views. It is much easier to have one if statement in your controller and redirect view to "not found" page rather than having several ifs in your views.

Alternatively you could add this

protected
  def rescue_not_found
  render :template => 'application/not_found', :status => :not_found
end

to your application_controller. See more here: https://ariejan.net/2011/10/14/rails-3-customized-exception-handling

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Cool, this is just the sort of information I was looking for. Thanks! –  Squadrons Jan 10 '13 at 1:40
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