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I have a matrix of integers like this:

1 1 1 0 3 3 3 0 2 2
1 1 1 0 3 3 3 0 2 2
0 0 0 0 3 3 3 0 0 0 
2 2 0 0 3 3 3 0 4 4
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 1 0 4 4 4 0

where I have different areas of the same value that are separated by "0"s and I need to count how many areas are in the matrix. My algorithm is based on the "0"s and every time a "0" is found a new area is about to come so I increment the counter. The problem is that I search row by row and enter the same area more than once. I only need to count the rectangular areas.

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Showing one example would make your question more understandable. –  User 104 Jan 10 '13 at 0:58
    
How are the matrices stored? –  Ben Jan 10 '13 at 0:59
    
Are the areas guaranteed to be rectangles? –  GManNickG Jan 10 '13 at 0:59
    
the answer for this matrix is 7 –  Buradi Jan 10 '13 at 1:00
    
@GManNickG yes they are –  Buradi Jan 10 '13 at 1:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One simple, fast algorithm is to iterate over all entries and set each region to zeroes when it is encountered. This takes O(N*M) runtime (each entry visited at most twice) and O(1) additional memory.

To set a region to zeroes, just note the column where it begins, then iterate to the rightmost column. Then iterate over the rows below from the left to right columns, setting each entry to zero.

Working code:

int count_regions( int *arr, int rows, int cols ) {
    int region_count = 0;

    for ( int first_index = 0; first_index != rows * cols; ++ first_index ) {
        if ( arr[ first_index ] == 0 ) continue;

        ++ region_count;

        int first_row = first_index / cols, first_col = first_index % cols;
        int last_col;
        for ( last_col = first_col;
              last_col != cols && arr[ first_row * cols + last_col ] != 0;
              ++ last_col ) ;

        for ( int last_row = first_row; 
              last_row != rows && arr[ last_row * cols + first_col ] != 0;
              ++ last_row ) {
            for ( int col = first_col; col != last_col; ++ col ) {
                arr[ last_row * cols + col ] = 0;
            }
        }
    }
    return region_count;
}
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This will work for rectangular entries. The general version I posted works for entries of any shape. –  Mel Nicholson Jan 10 '13 at 1:11
    
@MelNicholson Yep, I made that assumption. Come to think of it, the bitmap fill is easier to compute if you have an original, unmodified copy sitting around… –  Potatoswatter Jan 10 '13 at 1:14
    
could you give me a pseudocode as an example, it would be easier for me to understand –  Buradi Jan 10 '13 at 1:16
    
@Buradi even better… –  Potatoswatter Jan 10 '13 at 1:36
    
You modified the input array... add a copy –  Mel Nicholson Jan 10 '13 at 1:57

The painting technique works well. The idea is that you drop a paint bomb that completely covers an area. Pseudocode:

for (each space) {
  if (space has been painted or is a border) continue;
  else {
    numAreas++;
    drop paint bomb
  }
}

And a paint bomb works like this:

paint space;
for (each adjacent space) {
  if (space has been painted or space is a border) continue;
  else {
    paint space;
    drop another bomb;
  }
}
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in the case i am not allowed to modify the original matrix, is it more convinient to make a copy of the matrix and apply this method or to create another boolean matrix of the same size? –  Buradi Jan 10 '13 at 1:09
    
Creating a boolean matrix of the same size would work. Copying the matrix doesn't help. –  Mel Nicholson Jan 10 '13 at 1:10
    
@Buradi It would be easiest to make your own copy. Converting to Boolean or changing the format entirely could improve efficiency, but would certainly be more work. –  Potatoswatter Jan 10 '13 at 1:11
1  
@Potatoswatter the boolean matrix starts as false (unpainted) and each is marked as true when painted. That avoids the need for specially marking the starting column or making assumptions about the size or shape of the region. –  Mel Nicholson Jan 10 '13 at 1:15

One way is to use the Flood Fill algorithm to detect contiguous areas, like this:

Assuming that the initial matrix has only positive numbers,

  • Prepare a counter, set it to -1
  • For each point in the matrix:
  • If the cell is zero or negative, skip it; otherwise
  • Flood fill starting at the cell with the negative value of the counter
  • Decrement the counter after the flood fill is over

When you reach the end of your matrix, counter will have the negative number equal to the number of contiguous numbered areas minus one, i.e. the result that you need is -(counter+1).

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I always liked the Union/Find algorithm for isolating groups. But that's cos I had an old implementation kicking around that I had written years ago. It's not a big deal to implement, but it might be more appropriate to use Flood Fill.

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