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I have my custom annotation and I want to scan all the classes for this annotation at runtime. What is the best way to do this? I'm not using Spring.

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3  
getClass().getAnnotations()? –  Approaching Darkness Fish Jan 10 '13 at 1:46

2 Answers 2

You could use the Reflections Library to determine the class names first and then use getAnnotations to check for the annotation:

Reflections reflections = new Reflections("org.package.foo");

Set<Class<? extends Object>> allClasses = 
                 reflections.getSubTypesOf(Object.class);


for (Class clazz : allClasses) {
   Annotation[] annotations = clazz.getAnnotations();

   for (Annotation annotation : annotations) {
     if (annotation instanceof MyAnnotation) {
        MyAnnotation myAnnotation = (MyAnnotation) annotation;
        System.out.println("value: " + myAnnotation.value());
     }
   }
}     
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Thanks. The main reason for using the annotation was to scan them and instantiate the classes during init and use a hashmap for lookup when i need the objects. However, i've been thinking of using a factory instead to return the objects that i need. I'm unsure about which approach would be cleaner and faster? –  12rad Jan 10 '13 at 16:57
    
The factory approach would give you better performance and allow easier debugging given that you wouldnt be using reflection. The solution above provides a catch-all class scan for a given package. –  Reimeus Jan 10 '13 at 17:23

You might get annotations from the class using getClass().getAnnotations() or ask for a particular annotation if you don't want to loop over the results of the previous. In order for the annotation to appear on the result it's retention must be RUNTIME. For example (not strictly correct):

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.TYPE)
public @interface MyAnnotation {}

Check the Javadoc: Class#getAnnotation(Class)

And after that your class should be annotated like this:

@MyAnnotation public class MyClass {}    
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. The main reason for using the annotation was to scan them and instantiate the classes during init and use a hashmap for lookup when i need the objects. However, i've been thinking of using a factory instead to return the objects that i need. I'm unsure about which approach would be cleaner and faster? –  12rad Jan 10 '13 at 16:57

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