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So I have a function that goes like this:

public void doSomeWork(List<Item> items){
    //modify the items
    return;
}

Is it a good design to return void, or am I better off just returning the list?

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closed as not constructive by Brian Roach, duffymo, pst, jonsca, Perception Jan 10 '13 at 6:14

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This question is fairly subjective. But I would use void or have a useful return value: e.g. what is the outcome of "do some work"? I would never - without very good reason, anyway - return the "input collection", and even less so if it is mutated. In this case returning the "input collection" is likely not useful; it's an uncommon use-case to wish to desire "chaining" it as such. –  user166390 Jan 10 '13 at 1:43
    
Why would you return the list if you do not need it? A design in general is not done at the method level anyway. –  fge Jan 10 '13 at 1:43
    
if you set your method to return void and you want to modify some items and want to use that items in somewhere else, you can set that items to be public. in this way you could modify the items and after you modify that items, you can use it. –  Ardhian 'koponk' Nugroho Jan 10 '13 at 4:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look at the JDK itself. Do you see methods that return void? (I do.)

Your choice doesn't have to do with false notions of what's correct or proper. It's about whether or not you wish to allow side effects.

You can write that method either one of two ways:

public void doSomeWork(List<Item> items){
    // You can't modify the items reference, but you can modify the List that it points to by adding or removing Items.
}

This has the side effect of modifying the List that's passed it. It could be an unpleasant surprise to clients if they aren't aware of it.

The second way would mean passing in a List and returning the modified version:

public List<Item> doSomeWork(List<Item> items){
    List<Item> modified = new ArrayList<Item>(items);
    // modify the returned List
    return modified;
}

There are no surprises for clients this way: the List that's passed in remains unmodified. It's a more functional style. It's "fluent", too. But it comes at the price of more memory, since you allocate a new List.

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Sure. If there's nothing to return, the return type is void. You don't need an explicit return; statement either. Just let execution fall off the bottom of the function.

public void doSomeWork(List<Item> items){
    //modify the items
}

The question boils down to if you have a meaningful return value. It's perfectly fine not to.

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It's perfectly fine to not return anything if it makes sense semantically to not return anything.

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1  
Upvote, the answer to this question really depends on context. If the method is sorting the list, it's fine (though an extension method would be better), if you're changing the meaning of the list (e.g. changing a list of full names to a list of last names), perhaps it's better to return a new list. –  rikkit Jan 10 '13 at 1:48

Even its void, if you need to exit from method at some point you could use return;. Otherwise no need to do so.

public void doSomeWork(List<Item> items){
   if(some condition){
   return;
   }
    // Do my work
 }
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Not sure why you were downvoted, you're correct about using return to exit the function prematurely. –  user238033 Jan 10 '13 at 1:50
    
Yes I'm also just wondering :) –  abc123 Jan 10 '13 at 1:51

There are times in which a method doesn't need to return a value. All of its work is simply done internally, and no indication really needs to go out.

It's a fine design practice, especially with features such as setters and init() methods. Neither of these are required to return a value to whomever called it to indicate anything.

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