Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some inherited code and a function which takes a character array as a parameter.

typedef char myString[256];

void MyFunc(myString param)
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++)
  {
     if (param[i] ....

I would like to make this more efficient and pass a pointer to the char array:

void MyFunc(myString *param)
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++)
  {
     if (*param[i] <========= Thsi is wrong

When I try to reference the array elements, I get the wrong value, so obviously something is wrong with my pointer dereferencing. It has been a while since I coded in C, so I can't see the obvious mistake.

Can someone please point it out?

share|improve this question
5  
When passed to a functions, arrays "decay" to pointers anyway. You won't make it more efficient by playing games like that. –  dmckee Jan 10 '13 at 3:45
2  
Time to study array semantics –  Ed S. Jan 10 '13 at 3:49
    
This might be helpful material BTW: The C Book - Arrays, the & operator and functions. One of my favourite C references. –  detly Jan 10 '13 at 3:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You probably don't want to pass it via a pointer; when you use the type in the argument, it becomes a pointer anyway, and second level of indirection is less efficient.

If you do use the 'pointer to an array' notation, then you need parentheses to get the precedence correct:

if ((*param)[i] ...)
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and the answer, thanks. Told you my C was rusty ;-) –  Mawg Jan 10 '13 at 5:01

// This is OK: an array can be treated as "char *", and vice versa char myString[256];

void MyFunc(char * param)
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++)
  {
     if (param[i] ...

Q: I would like to make this more efficient and pass a pointer to the char array

A: There's absolutely no difference in efficiency whether you pass "param[]" or "*param"

for (i = 0; i < 256; i++)
  {
     if (*param[i] <==== <========= Thsi is wrong

Yup - it's wrong. Again, "param[]" and "*param" should be treated the same way.

Same with or without the "typedef", too :)

Finally, here's the same program with the typedef:

typedef char myString[256];

void MyFunc(myString param) 
// This is treated as "MyFunc(char param[256])" 
// It is *identical* to "MyFunc(char * param)"
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++)
  {
     if (param[i] ....
share|improve this answer
1  
There is a difference, in both notation and efficiency, when the parameter to the function is MyFunc(myString *param) instead of just MyFunc(myString param). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 10 '13 at 3:54

myString * is a pointer to a char array with 256 elements, i.e., param has type

char (*)[256]

so you have to dereference param first, then access its element.

  1. By dereferencing param, you got the address of the first element of the array param points to.
  2. (*param)[i] is then the ith element of the array in question.
share|improve this answer

use as below :

if (*(param +i) ...)
...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.