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Why does this() and super() have to be the first statement in a constructor?

Why exactly do subclass constructors have to explicitly call super class constructors? What is the reason for this?

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marked as duplicate by A--C, dasblinkenlight, murgatroid99, Robert Rouhani, valex Jan 10 '13 at 8:23

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4 Answers 4

They don't.

If you don't explicitly call a superconstructor, it's equivalent to calling the parameterless superconstructor.

public class Sub
{
    public Sub()
    {
        // Do some stuff
    }
}

is equivalent to:

public class Sub
{
    public Sub()
    {
        super();
        // Do some stuff
    }
}

You do explicitly have to call a superconstructor if you want to specify arguments. That's pretty reasonable, IMO - would you really want the compiler guessing which arguments you wanted to supply?

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1  
Also, if your parent class do not have a parameterless constructor then you will need to explicitly call your super constructor with the necessary arguments. –  Claudio Jan 10 '13 at 3:46
3  
@ClaudioFernandez: Yes, I hoped that was implied - if there's no parameterless constructor, you can't implicitly call it :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 10 '13 at 3:49
    
there is always a parameter less constructor in superclass created by jvm to see it just type <b>javap classname<b> on cmd prompt. –  Abhishekkumar Jan 10 '13 at 4:06
2  
@Abhishekkumar: No, there isn't. The compiler provides a default constructor if no other constructor is specified. If you specify a constructor with parameters but no parameterless constructor, then attempts to implicitly call a parameterless constructor from the subclass will fail. –  Jon Skeet Jan 10 '13 at 4:18
class Parent
{ 
   Parent(int x) {}
}

class Child
{
   Child(){} // will not compile.
}

Compiler tries to invoke super() as the first line of Child() constructor but the parent doesn't have no-arg constructor. So in this case you have to do it explicitly by calling super(5), for example.

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subclass implicitly call even default constructor present in super class which is non parameterised. We have to call explicitly when we pass parameters to the constructor.

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As mentioned above, you only have to invoke a super constructor if there isn't a default constructor in the parent class.

This is required because the parent class must be initialized by one of its constructors, and if there isn't a default constructor, the java compiler has no way of knowing which constructor to call, or what parameters need to be passed.

To better understand why at least one constructor in the parent must be called, consider the following:

class Person {
    private Person mother;
    private Person father;

    public Person(Person mother, Person father) {
        assert mother != null && father != null: "Parents can't be null!";

        this.mother = mother;
        this.father = father;
    }

    public boolean hasAnyLivingParents() {
        return mother.isAlive() || father.isAlive();
    }

    public boolean isAlive() { return true; }
}

If you create a Person directly, you must specify the mother and father of the person, and the hasAnyLivingParents() method expects these to be specified.

Now, consider you have a subclass, Employee, and you don't care about the parents of an Employee, so you want to write something like this:

class Employee extends Person {
    double salary;

    public Employee(double salary) { 
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

This won't compile because we don't call a constructor of Person, and there isn't a default constructor. If this did compile, calling (new Employee(50000d)).hasAnyLivingParents() would always throw a NullPointerException, since nothing even initialized the mother and father fields.

In short, java requires that every class be initialized by some constructor. If there isn't a default constructor on a class, one of its other constructors must be called for the object to be initialized.

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