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I'm playing with GWT's Animation class as an exercise. My goal is not to create yet another widget/animation library for GWT. Also, I'm well aware that there are many libraries that do this. What I'm trying to do is learn how this can be done, not how to use some library. This is for educational purposes only....

With that said, I've implemented a simple class that performs 4 different animations on some widget: fade in, fade out, slide in, and slide out (following jQuery's animation model). See the code below for how I've implemented it.

LIVE DEMO: http://www.rodrigo-silveira.com/gwt-custom-animation/

My question: How can I smoothly [and successfully] stop an animation as soon as another one is triggered, and continue the current animation where the old one left off?

For example, if the slideIn() is half way through when slideOut() is called, how can I start sliding out from the widget's natural height of 50%? I tried keeping a member variable that always keeps track of the current progress so I could use that in a new animation, but can't seem to get it right. Any ideas?

import com.google.gwt.animation.client.Animation;
import com.google.gwt.dom.client.Style.Unit;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.Element;

public class RokkoAnim extends Animation {

    private Element element;
    private int currentOp;
    private final static int FADE_OUT = 0;
    private final static int FADE_IN = 1;
    private final static int SLIDE_IN = 2;
    private final static int SLIDE_OUT = 3;


    public RokkoAnim(Element element) {
        this.element = element;
    }

    public void fadeOut(int durationMilli) {
        cancel();
        currentOp = RokkoAnim.FADE_OUT;
        run(durationMilli);
    }

    public void fadeIn(int durationMilli) {
        cancel();
        currentOp = RokkoAnim.FADE_IN;
        run(durationMilli);
    }

    public void slideIn(int durationMilli) {
        cancel();
        currentOp = RokkoAnim.SLIDE_IN;
        run(durationMilli);
    }

    public void slideOut(int durationMilli) {
        cancel();
        currentOp = RokkoAnim.SLIDE_OUT;
        run(durationMilli);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onUpdate(double progress) {
        switch (currentOp) {
        case RokkoAnim.FADE_IN:
            doFadeIn(progress);
            break;
        case RokkoAnim.FADE_OUT:
            doFadeOut(progress);
            break;
        case RokkoAnim.SLIDE_IN:
            doSlideIn(progress);
            break;
        case RokkoAnim.SLIDE_OUT:
            doSlideOut(progress);
            break;
        }
    }

    private void doFadeOut(double progress) {
        element.getStyle().setOpacity(1.0d - progress);
    }

    private void doFadeIn(double progress) {
        element.getStyle().setOpacity(progress);
    }

    private void doSlideIn(double progress) {
        double height = element.getScrollHeight();
        element.getStyle().setHeight(height * (1.0d - progress), Unit.PX);
    }

    private void doSlideOut(double progress) {
            // Hard coded value. How can I find out what
            // the element's max natural height is if it's 
            // currently set to height: 0 ?
        element.getStyle().setHeight(200 * progress, Unit.PX);
    }
}

Usage

// 1. Get some widget
FlowPanel div = new FlowPanel();

// 2. Instantiate the animation, passing the widget
RokkoAnim anim = new RokkoAnim(div.getElement());

// 3. Perform the animation

// >> inside mouseover event of some widget:
anim.fadeIn(1500);

// >> inside mouseout event of some widget:
anim.fadeOut(1500);
share|improve this question
    
Can you share your code, where you start your Animation? –  Sam Jan 16 '13 at 9:50
    
@Sam Just edited post. See Usage example. –  rodrigo-silveira Jan 16 '13 at 16:03
    
shouldn't it be: anim.fadeIn(1500) instead of div.fadeIn(1500) (same goes for fadeOut)? –  Eliran Malka Jan 18 '13 at 14:16
    
Oops... Good eye. Thanks. –  rodrigo-silveira Jan 18 '13 at 15:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

You need to update the opacity based on the current value (equivalent to += or -= assignments):

private void doFadeOut(double progress) {
    double opacity = element.getStyle().getOpacity();
    element.getStyle().setOpacity(opacity - 1.0d - progress);
}

private void doFadeIn(double progress) {
    double opacity = element.getStyle().getOpacity();
    element.getStyle().setOpacity(opacity + progress);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that changing CSS values this much will lead to bad browser performance. If you can, you should use CSS transformation, e.g. something like transition: opacity .25s ease-in-out;, and just set or unset a class in doFadeIn and doFadeOut. –  Maarten Oct 18 '13 at 19:49
  1. Add a instance method bool canceled to your annimation class
  2. Only run the annimation if not canceled.
  3. Add a method cancelAnnimation and call this method everytime when the new annimation starts.

    private bool canceled = false;
    
    public void cancelAnnimation() {
        canceled = true;
    }
    
    private void doFadeOut(double progress) {
        if(!canceled) {
           element.getStyle().setOpacity(1.0d - progress);
        }
    }
    
    ... etc.
    

So thats the way you can stop the animation. But now, you need to start the new animation from the current point. So the best was to modify the class again.

  1. add two instance variables currentProgress and offset (double)
  2. add an double offset to the constructor
  3. return currentProgress when cancel the annimation.
  4. start the new animation with the offset from the first animation.

    private bool canceled = false;
    private double currentProgress = 0;
    private double offset = 0;
    
    public RokkoAnim(Element element, double offset) {
        this.element = element;
        this.offset = offset;
    }
    
    public double cancelAnimation() {
        canceled = true;
        return currentProgress;
    }
    
    private void doFadeOut(double progress) {
    
        if(!canceled && ((progress + offset) <= 1)) {
           element.getStyle().setOpacity(1.0d - (progress+offset));
           currentProgress = progress+offset;
        }
    }
    
    ... etc.
    
    
    double offset = anim1.cancelAnimation();
    RokkoAnim anim2 = new RokkoAnim(div.getElement(), offset);
    
share|improve this answer
    
Why set the factor to -1? This value doesn't work. If a widget is fadingIn... it starts with opacity = 0, and by the time its opacity is at 0.7 (70% visible), the widget starts to fadeOut. So we set factor to -1 and stop fadingIn. So the fadeOut should start with opacity = 0.7 (instead of 1.0, as it currently does), and decrease the opacity from there. According to your suggestion, when doFadeOut is first called (with process ~= 0.1), opacity should be no more than 0.7. But your math sets the opacity to (1 - (-1 * 0.1)) = 1.1, which is wrong. –  rodrigo-silveira Jan 18 '13 at 16:22
    
You are right i made a mistake. I thought you want to rollback the running annimation. But even than you have to keep track of the current occupacity. –  Sam Jan 19 '13 at 9:42
    
Still not working. Especially if I need to create a new instance of the anim class every time I need a different animation. –  rodrigo-silveira Jan 19 '13 at 16:03
    
Based on Robert C. Martin's book Clean Code, you should split you animation class into 4 classes. One for fadeIn, one for fadeOut, etc... You should not make 4 animations in one class. The Book amazon.com/Clean-Code-Handbook-Software-Craftsmanship/dp/… should been readed from every developer. –  Sam Jan 21 '13 at 6:17

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