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[javac] C:\ws\galileo\test\Cacheable.java:13: incompatible types
[javac] found   : com.io.CacheType
[javac] required: com.io.CacheType
[javac]  public CacheType id() default CacheType.COMMON;

I really don't get this one. I have a project where I'm custom building a caching interceptor for Spring. It simply is a look by cache name to point to EhCache and uses aop-autoproxy to load the CacheableAspect (which is my caching intercepter). Now when I use the default value in the annotation, ANT gives me the compiler error below. I tried updating to the latest JDK (i'm on 1.6 16 now) and setting source/target levels in the ant script but no success. When I remove the default value and force all areas to specify a value, it compiles in ant fine.

It always worked in Eclipse, I had unit tests that ran perfectly with the previous default value.

What gives? I tried building a project (no spring) that simply echoed the configuration with ant and it compiled in ant fine (and in eclipse).

that tells me MAYBE it might be the spring auto-proxying somehow? but then why would the compiler not give me the generated type name? GRRRR. Any thoughts?

import java.lang.annotation.ElementType;
import java.lang.annotation.Retention;
import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;
import java.lang.annotation.Target;

import com.io.CacheType;

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME) 
@Target({ElementType.METHOD}) 
public @interface Cacheable {
 public CacheType value() default Cachetype.COMMON;
}

public enum CacheType {

 COMMON("common"),
 PERSISTENT("persistent";

 private String cache;

 CacheType(String cache) {
  this.cache = cache;
 }

 public String cache() {
  return this.cache;
 }
}
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9 Answers 9

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Still present in JDK 6u25, but adding package to default value does the trick:

CacheType value() default com.io.CacheType.COMMON;
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1  
this saved me some time, thank you! –  arturnt Dec 28 '11 at 4:32
    
in JDK 1.6.0_31 or 1.7.0_03 this bug is fixed (see answer below) –  rurouni Mar 28 '12 at 8:08
1  
Stack overflow, I love you. You too @yurez. –  snappieT Oct 1 '13 at 17:31
    
Thank you! This saved me! –  Shervin Asgari Feb 18 '14 at 11:03

Have a look here: http://bugs.sun.com/view%5Fbug.do?bug%5Fid=6512707 this might be the cause of your problem.

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The latest Sun JDK (6u20) still has this bug in. Compiling with either OpenJDK or JDT (part of eclipse) solved the problem for me. JDT can be used outside of eclipse (e.g. in ant) details here: help.eclipse.org/ganymede/index.jsp?topic=/…. To use pluggable annotation processors you will need org.eclipse.jdt.apt.pluggable.core<version>.jar and org.eclipse.jdt.compiler.apt<version>.jar in your classpath, these can be found in the plugins folder of the eclipse installation. –  Reuben Peeris May 20 '10 at 8:21

So just a little update. While the bug tracker shows the bug as closed and seems to want to refute any new openings of the bug. When I encountered this bug in this example revolves around the compile time annotation processor. Since the retention is RUNTIME which means it does not require a compile time annotation processor it appears that the compile time annotation processer is blowing up the compile process. Whenever I am in NetBeans and I have compile time annotations enabled under Build->Compiling in the projects properties I receive a nebulous series of errors.

I am going to attempt opening a new bug ticket for the issue and just thought I would pass on the easy workaround for now.

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I opened a new more current bug. Lets hope they don't just auto close it as a duplicate. bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=7037412 –  PaulSCoder Apr 18 '11 at 13:08

Still present using javac 1.6.0_26. yurez's workaround of using the fully qualified type name when specifying the default value still works.

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Found this bug is solved in 1.6.0_31 and 1.7.0_03 (maybe also in some previous versions), so just upgrade the java compiler.

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Was it bug of compiler only or also JRE? The point is, if I compile it in 1.6.0u31 whether it will work in older version of JRE 1.6. –  Gaim Mar 3 '13 at 15:10
    
@Gaim it's a compiler bug, not a JRE bug, so take a guess. –  Matt Ball Mar 8 '14 at 19:45

I wonder if it this is caused by defining Cacheable and CacheType in the same source file, and then importing "com.io.CacheType". That could conceivably make the compiler think that there are two classes called "com.io.CacheType".

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Could you post the entire source file or something? The code you posted seems copy/pasted from different source files and is full of typos.

Normally the following should always do the trick when CacheType enum is in a different source file, you had a typo in CacheType.COMMON:

public @interface Cacheable {
 public CacheType value() default CacheType.COMMON;
}
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It was in a different source file and you're right looks like I have a typo. I'll post it when I get home since I'm at work right now. –  Core Sep 15 '09 at 15:27

Why do we have two public entities in a source file?

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Works with a Fully qualified type name.

import java.lang.annotation.ElementType;
import java.lang.annotation.Retention;
import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;
import java.lang.annotation.Target;

import com.io.CacheType;

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME) 
@Target({ElementType.METHOD}) 
public @interface Cacheable {
 public CacheType value() default com.io.Cachetype.COMMON;
}
share|improve this answer

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