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How to use a single constructor only to create the following objects using C++:

A x;
A y("Hello", 7);
A z(3, "Hello", 2.4);

class A should be having a single constructor to accomodate the creation of objects x, y and z. No change is allowed in the 3 lines specified above.

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Isn't there any mistake in your example? If the 3-d expression was A z("Hello", 3, 2.4) the task would be rather simple. –  Fomin Arseniy Jan 10 '13 at 4:48
    
No it's exactly the way it was given to me and when I asked for it, they said that was intentional and that's the whole tricky part in this problem. –  user1965489 Jan 10 '13 at 5:08

5 Answers 5

You cannot(rather should not!) have a single constructor to create all these objects.
You can have constructors which can take different parameters precisely for this reason.

The important question to be asked is:
What exactly are you trying to achieve? What is the need for this?
Perhaps you are trying to solve a problem in wrong way. If you can provide some detail We could help you better.

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Simple. That should do the trick. –  Mark Garcia Jan 10 '13 at 4:46
    
Iam not trying to solve anything here, but this was asked in a technical interview, where I got rejected since the answer was not kwnown to me. –  user1965489 Jan 10 '13 at 5:04

Yuck!!!!

Anyway, if I was forced to (for example if this, hypothetically speaking, were a homework problem) I would use some sort of variant:

class Variant {
  public:
    Variant();
    Variant( int );
    Variant( double );
    Variant( const char * );
    ~Variant();

  private:
    union data { ... };
    enum type { ... };
};

And then use that in my horrid single constructor, along with default arguments to allow empty construction.

A::A( Variant p1 = Variant(), Variant p2 = Variant(), Variant p3 = Variant() ); 
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@paddy..hi could you explain how this would work? I dont quite follow it –  SP6 Jan 10 '13 at 4:51
    
It relies on implicit construction of a Variant. You make the constructor for A accept up to three Variant values which default to empty. So if you pass an integer, the Variant(int) is used, and so on... It's cheating a little, because it's using multiple constructors on a different class... –  paddy Jan 10 '13 at 5:00
    
Excellent. Thanks for the solution. With the single constructor the problem is solved. –  user1965489 Jan 10 '13 at 5:59

With c++11:

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    template<typename... Args> A(Args&&... x)
    {   
        std::cout << "construct A\n";
    }   
};

int main()
{
  A x;
  A y("Hello", 7); 
  A z(3, "Hello", 2.4);
  return 0;
}
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This was meant to be written without c++11 –  user1965489 Jan 10 '13 at 6:04

In C++03 you can use initialization funntion:

class A
{
public:
    A(int x, const char* y, double z)
    {
        Init(x, y, z);
    }

    A(const char* y, int x)
    {
        Init(x, y);
    }

    A()
    {
        Init();
    }

private:
    void Init(int x = 0, const char* y = 0, double z = 0)
    {
    }
};

In C++11 you can use constructor delegation:

class A
{
public:
    A(int x, const char* y, double z)
    {
    }

    A(const char* y, int x)
        : A(x, y, 0)
    {
    }

    A()
        : A(0, 0, 0)
    {
    }
};
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Why not just:?

class A {
public:
    A(...) { }
};

// test:
int main() {
    A x;
    A y("Hello", 7);
    A z(3, "Hello", 2.4); 
}
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