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If I have a factor function f:

typedef std::vector<int> IntVec;
const IntVec f(...) {
    IntVec retval;
    ...
    return retval;
}

and I need to delay the definition after declaration as follow:

IntVec instance;
if (...) {
    instance = f(a, ...);
}
else {
    instance = f(b, ...);
}

Is there a suggested way to do it?


Now, I use pointer of container to do it like:

std::auto_ptr<IntVec> pinstance(NULL);
if (...) {
    pinstance.reset(new IntVec(f(a, ...)));
}
else {
    pinstance.reset(new IntVec(f(b, ...)));
}
IntVec& instance(*pinstance);

Is there a better way?

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

IntVec retval;

All this creates is an empty vector. It is initialized, but as far as contents go, empty and you can add to it as you see fit.

Also,

IntVec instance;
if (...) {
    instance = f(a, ...);
}
else {
    instance = f(b, ...);
}

This is legal.

Instance does get overwritten by the return of f but efficiency hit is negligible, and I doubt you are running this function often.

Also you could do something like this..

IntVec instance = f(...?a:b,...);
                    //if

If your if statement is as simple as you show it.

Finally your example with the pointer is flawed.

I am guessing pinstance will be destroyed soon before instance, in which case instance becomes a dangling reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Ya, you are right. My example needs programmer to take care of dangling reference. – wush978 Jan 10 '13 at 5:35
    
By the way, is IntVec instance; instance = f(...); as efficient as IntVec instance(f(...)); ? – wush978 Jan 10 '13 at 17:42
    
@wush978 I am not sure. All I am sure of is that the difference is too small to matter. You could run tests to check. – Karthik T Jan 10 '13 at 23:17

Using C++11, swapping can be extremely efficient if your data type supports move-assignment:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> inst;
    std::srand((unsigned)time(0));

    // code to set condition.
    if (rand()%2)
    {
        std::vector<int> v1(10,10);
        std::swap(inst, v1);

        cout << "V1" << endl;
        std::copy(v1.begin(), v1.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout,"\n"));
    }
    else
    {
        std::vector<int> v2(11,11);
        std::swap(inst, v2);

        cout << "V2" << endl;
        std::copy(v2.begin(), v2.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout,"\n"));
    }

    cout << "Instance" << endl;
    std::copy(inst.begin(), inst.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout,"\n"));

    return 0;
}

Output

V2
Instance
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11

Note no content in V2, as it has swapped with the empty vector inst.

It looks like you've already gotten a handle on the dangling reference, so I'll leave that out for the second part of your question.

share|improve this answer

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