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I am trying to convert RcppArmadillo vector (e.g. arma::colvec) to a Rcpp vector (NumericVector). I know I can first convert arma::colvec to SEXP and then convert SEXP to NumericVector (e.g. as<NumericVector>(wrap(temp)), assuming temp is an arma::colvec object). But what is a good way to do that?

I want to do that simply because I am unsure if it is okay to pass arma::colvec object as a parameter to an Rcpp::Function object.

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2  
what happened when you tried it ? Trying something is a good way of testing if if works and when it does not work, often the compiler tells you why. –  Romain Francois Jan 10 '13 at 11:13
    
And if and when it works, you could even time it and compare different ways of doing it... –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jan 10 '13 at 18:19
    
'as<NumericVector>(wrap(temp)' has been the way that I used. It is compiled without any error and returns correct answer. But recently, when I put my function to a unix cluster for running big simulation. I encounter some errors like: –  Raymond Wong Jan 10 '13 at 18:41
    
Sorry I mistyped an enter and passed the 5 mins for editing... My comments continue as: I encounter some errors like:'Rcpp::eval_error in eval(expr, envir, enclos): unused argument(s) (error = function (e)', 'Rcpp::eval_error in eval(expr, envir, enclos): promise already under evaluation: recursive default argument reference or earlier problems?', ... My entire program performs deterministic job, but when I reran the exact same codes without the above error. So it confuses me. 'as<NumericVector>(wrap(temp)' is the part that I am curious if I am right to do that. –  Raymond Wong Jan 10 '13 at 18:57
    
What versions of R, Rcpp and RcppArmadillo are installed on the cluster? –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jan 11 '13 at 17:30

2 Answers 2

I was trying to Evaluate a Rcpp::Function with argument arma::vec, it seems that it takes the argument in three forms without compilation errors. That is, if f is a Rcpp::Function and a is a arma::vec, then

  1. f(a)
  2. f(Rcpp::wrap(a))
  3. f(Rcpp.as<NumericVector>(wrap(a)))

produce no compilation and runtime errors, at least apparently.

For this reason, I have conducted a little test for the three versions of arguments. Since I suspect that somethings will go wrong in garbage collection, I test them again gctorture.

gctorture(on=FALSE)
Rcpp::sourceCpp(code = '
#include <RcppArmadillo.h>
// [[Rcpp::depends(RcppArmadillo)]]

using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
double foo1(arma::vec a, arma::vec b, Function f){
    double sum = 0.0;
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
        sum += as<double>(f(a, b));
    }
    return sum;
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
double foo2(arma::vec a, arma::vec b, Function f){
    double sum = 0.0;
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
        sum += as<double>(f(wrap(a),wrap(b)));
    }
    return sum;
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
double foo3(arma::vec a, arma::vec b, Function f){
    double sum = 0.0;
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
        sum += as<double>(f(as<NumericVector>(wrap(a)),as<NumericVector>(wrap(b))));
    }
    return sum;
}
')
# note that when gctorture is on, the program will be very slow as it
# tries to perfrom GC for every allocation.
gctorture(on=TRUE)
f = function(x,y) {
    mean(x) + mean(y)
}

# all three functions should return 700
foo1(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # error
foo2(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # wrong answer (occasionally)!
foo3(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # correct answer

As a result, the first method produces an error, the second method produces a wrong answer and only the third conversion returns a correct answer.

> # all three functions should return 700
> foo1(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # error
Error: invalid multibyte string at '<80><a1><e2>'
> foo2(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # wrong answer (occasionally)!
[1] 712
> foo3(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # correct answer
[1] 700

Note that, if gctorture is set FALSE, then all three functions will return a correct result.

> foo1(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # error
[1] 700
> foo2(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # wrong answer (occasionally)!
[1] 700
> foo3(c(1,2,3), c(4,5,6), f) # correct answer
[1] 700

It means that method 1 and method 2 are subjected to break when garbage is collected during runtime and we don't know when it happens. Thus, it is very DANGEROUS to not wrap the parameter using Rcpp.as<NumericVector>(wrap(a)) and it is the only (to my knowledge) correct way to do so.

Edit: another way to do the conversion is NumericVector(a.begin(),a.end()) where a is arma::vec.

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Let's just think this through for a second. You are using eval() to let R evaluate an object managed by Armadillo data structures, and you are relying on implicit conversion. I would at a minimum explicitly pass from Armadillo data structure to Rcpp data structures. Besides, eval() is a very last resort which is almost more or less foregoing the gains of operating in C++ in the first place. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Mar 12 at 11:24
    
It is true that writing a R function and passing it to Rcpp performs much worse than writing a c function. But it is sometimes necessary to allow user defined functions, an example would be approximating first derivative of a given function. –  Randy Lai Mar 12 at 14:00
1  
I appreciate that you agree that it is a bad idea that ought to be avoided. Now on to my second point: if you really think you must call R from C(++), do it with an R data structure. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Mar 12 at 14:11

I had the same question. I used wrap to do the conversion at the core of several layers of for loops and it was very slow. I think the wrap function is to blame for dragging the speed down so I wish to know if there is an elegant way to do this.

As for Raymond's question, you might want to try including the namespace like: Rcpp::as<Rcpp::NumericVector>(wrap(A)) instead or include a line using namespace Rcpp; at the beginning of your code.

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Reproducible example, or it doesn't exist. Are you sure the slowness is not from you calling Rcpp::Function repeatedly? –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jan 12 '13 at 20:07

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