Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to continue to utilise auto-implemented properties while still raising a change event, such as INotifyPropertyChanged, when Set is called?

Instead of:

private string _value;
public string Value
{
  get 
  { 
    return this._value;
  }
  set
  {
    this._value = value;
    this.ValueChanged(this,EventArgs.Empty);
  }
}

Can I just do:

public string Value 
{ 
   get; 
   set 
   { 
     this.ValueChanged(this,EventArgs.Empty); 
   }
}

Although the setter looks wrong, is it possible to do this without filling my class with backing-store variables?

UPDATE: Looks like there is no standard solution to my lazy objective, I think that the best solution is to use CodeRush or Resharper to generate all my backing stores for me.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't do this. The specification for automatically implemented properties is pretty clear:

Automatically implemented (auto-implemented) properties automate this pattern. More specifically, non-abstract property declarations are allowed to have semicolon accessor bodies. Both accessors must be present and both must have semicolon bodies, but they can have different accessibility modifiers. When a property is specified like this, a backing field will automatically be generated for the property, and the accessors will be implemented to read from and write to that backing field. The name of the backing field is compiler generated and inaccessible to the user.

In other words, they can only have "get;" and "set;", with the possibility of access modifiers.

share|improve this answer

No you can't, because you don't have access to private field that generated for that property

share|improve this answer

A quick Google search on "inotifypropertychanged auto properties" will lead you to several blog posts and articles on the subject. Here's one:

INotifyPropertyChanged auto wiring or how to get rid of redundant code

share|improve this answer
    
While I can see that this will work, it actually looks messier than using backing-store variables –  benPearce Sep 15 '09 at 5:49
    
benPearce: An automatic property is for when you don't want to write any other code in the setter or getter. If you do (like notifying of property changes) then you need to write it. I don't agree with the PostSharp approach, but it's certainly a solution of sorts. I'm quite comfortable with code that manually writes out the variables. –  Noon Silk Sep 15 '09 at 5:55
    
silky: I agree with you on the Postsharp, while it is a solution I am not particularly keen on it. –  benPearce Sep 15 '09 at 22:29

This has been asked of the Microsoft team behind C# 3.0 and they did say they would think about it, have a read here.

In the comments you will find more information, including why it's a bad idea if you need more control, as well as ways to achieve it.

share|improve this answer

You can use some AOP framework like PostSharp.

But it can reduce performance and build time.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like Postsharp 2.0 does exactly this - postsharp.org/blog/… –  benPearce Sep 15 '09 at 22:27

This behavior can be done with a proxy factory type generator. I already done that in my development Framework. If you use System.Reflection.Emit you can create a type proxier. Consider below example:

var a = Proxier<InputType>.CreateInstance(new object[] { }); // object arrays are for different constructors
a.PropertyAccessed += ...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.