Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get the indexes for each pattern that I find in a document. So far I have:

    String temp = "This is a test to see HelloWorld in a test that sees HelloWorld in a test";
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("HelloWorld");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
    int current = 0;
    int start;
    int end;

    while (matcher.find()) {
        start = matcher.start(current);
        end = matcher.end(current);
        System.out.println(temp.substring(start, end));
        current++;
    }

For some reason it keeps finding only the first instance of HelloWorld in temp though which results in an infinite loop. To be honest, I wasn't sure if you could use matcher.start(current) and matcher.end(current) - it was just a wild guess because matcher.group(current) worked before. This time I need the actual indexes though so matcher.group() wouldn't work for me.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modify the regex to look like this:

while (matcher.find()) {
    start = matcher.start();
    end = matcher.end();
    System.out.println(temp.substring(start, end));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see. I've browsed my code. I don't use current. –  Helio Santos Jan 10 '13 at 8:31

The problem is this line of code.

 start = matcher.start(current);

current is 1 after first iteration.

share|improve this answer

Don't pass the index to start(int) and end(int). The API states that the parameter is the group number. In your case, only zero is correct. Use start() and end() instead.

The matcher will move to the next match on each iteration because of your call to find():

This method starts at the beginning of the input sequence or, if a previous invocation of the method was successful and the matcher has not since been reset, at the first character not matched by the previous match.

share|improve this answer

If you just need the start and end offsets of your matched text, you don't need the current group, this will be ok:

    String temp = "This is a test to see HelloWorld in a test that sees HelloWorld in a test";
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("HelloWorld");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
    int current = 0;

    while (matcher.find()) {
        System.out.println(temp.substring(matcher.start(), matcher.end()));
    }
share|improve this answer
while (matcher.find()) {
    start = matcher.start();
    end = matcher.end();
    System.out.println(temp.substring(start, end));
}

Will do what you want.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.