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i have small issue with exchanging data in between methods in a JavaScript object (class):

var TEST = (function () {

    var TEST = function() {

    };

    TEST.prototype.get = function() {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: "http://test.com/getall",
            dataType: "json",
            success: function (data) {
                return data;  // if i console log this i will get a json obj
            }
        });
    };

    TEST.prototype.parse = function(data) {
        $.each(this.get(), function(k, v){
            console.log(v);
        });
    };

    return TEST;
})();

so i am trying to call one method in the each statement in another method. the issue is that

the response is undefined.

i also tried it like this, but with he same result

var testing = new TEST();
var get = testing.get();
testing.parse(get);

What am i missing? how can i return the data from this.get to be used in this.parse.

thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$.ajax() per default is asynchronous. That means, that the execution of your function get() wont wait until the request is finished. Hence you return no value from it, which results in undefined being returned.

In order to have your get() function be able to return a value, you would have to do the request in a synchronous way and set a variable in the outer function (as success itself is just another function, whose return value is not caught):

TEST.prototype.get = function() {
        var result;

        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: "http://test.com/getall",
            async: false, // this is the important part!
            dataType: "json",
            success: function (data) {
                result = data;  
            }
        });

        return result;
    };

EDIT

As mentioned by @pebbl, this will halt the execution of all your scripts, until the request is done. Hence your whole page will be blocked for the time being.

The general approach is to use callbacks in such cases, which will be executed once the requests finished. So in your case something like this:

TEST.prototype.get = function( cb ) {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: "http://test.com/getall",
            dataType: "json",
            success: function (data) {
                cb( data );
            }
        });
    };

with later on calling like this:

var testing = new TEST();
testing.get( function( data ) { 
  testing.parse( data );  
});
share|improve this answer
    
it works. thanks –  Patrioticcow Jan 10 '13 at 8:49
    
I wouldn't personally recommend this route, as I'm sure you are aware this will cause the code to hang until the ajax call has completed. Which can cause further problems in older browsers. –  Pebbl Jan 10 '13 at 8:49
    
@pebbl what would you recommend? –  Patrioticcow Jan 10 '13 at 8:50
    
@Patrioticcow Design a complete asynchronous workflow. So, e.g., pass a callback to your get() function, which will be executed after the request has finished. –  Sirko Jan 10 '13 at 8:52
    
i see. ,maybe i'll use complete: .. thanks –  Patrioticcow Jan 10 '13 at 8:55

You can't construct your function this way as you are relying on an asyncronous call, which will return it's result outside of the normal execution flow. The only way you can actually receive the result of your .get function is to use a callback.

Put simply your value isn't being returned from the .get function, it's being returned from the callback you are passing into jQuery's .ajax method.

You'd be far better off redesigning your code so as to still support the asyncronous call -- rather than disabling async.

A rough idea is to change your parse function like so:

TEST.prototype.parse = function(data) {
    this.get(function(result){
        $.each(result, function(k, v){
            console.log(v);
        });
    });
};

And to change your get function accordingly:

TEST.prototype.get = function(callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "http://test.com/getall",
        dataType: "json",
        success: callback
    });
};

The above is just a quick example, you'd be wise reading up on the following jQuery topics:

If you design your code around the promise pattern you'll find it complicated at first, but it gives you a lot of power in your code -- and gets around the whole callback stacking madness you can end up with when dealing in ajax calls.

Whilst it's not entirely clear from the jQuery.ajax documentation, this function returns a jqXHR object which implements the promise interface. So this means you can use the promise methods done, always and fail.

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