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When you want to use classes you created in Em.Application.create() in your router you need to specify the router outside of the application.create. But because the application is automatically initialized the router doesn't route to the / route.

You used to be able to defer the initialization by adding autoinit: false to the application.create. Now you are supposed to use App.deferReadiness() and App.advanceReadiness(). However this doesn't appear to work.

And I can't seem to escape the feeling that you are "supposed" to do it differently.

I added the minimal code to show the problem below. There is also a jsfiddle here

EDIT:

Apparently there is a new router in ember I kinda sorta overlooked that. I've changed the code to the new router, but guess what it still doesn't work :P

window.App = App = Em.Application.create({
    ApplicationController: Em.Controller.extend({}),

    ApplicationView: Em.View.extend({
        template: Em.Handlebars.compile('{{outlet}}'),
    }),

    ExtendedPatientController: Em.ObjectController.extend({}),

    ExtendedPatientView: Em.View.extend({
        classNames: ['patient-view', 'extended'],
        template: Em.Handlebars.compile('{{name}}')
    }),

    Patient: Em.Object.extend({
        name: undefined,
    }),
});

App.Router.map(function (match) {
  match('/').to('application', function (match) {
    match('/').to('extendedPatient');
  })
});

App.deferReadiness();

App.ExtendedPatientRoute = Em.Route.extend({
  setupController: function (controller) {
    controller.set('', App.Patient.create({
      name: "Bert"
    }));
  },
  renderTemplates: function () {
    this.render('extendedPatient', {
      into: 'application'
    });
  }
});

App.advanceReadiness();
share|improve this question
    
I would say you don't have usually to call defer/advanceReadiness at all. Could you try to define your views and controller outside of the Application.create()? Something like App.ExtendedPatientController = Ember.ObjectController.extend() ... –  sly7_7 Jan 10 '13 at 13:09
    
Allright I'll try thanks :) –  albertjan Jan 10 '13 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're actually doing a lot more work than you need to here.

Here's all the code that you need to make your example work.

Template:

<script type="text/x-handlebars" data-template-name="index">
  <div class="patient-view extended">
    <p>Name: {{name}}</p>
  </div>
</script>

App:

window.App = Em.Application.create();

App.Patient = Em.Object.extend({
  name: null
});

App.IndexRoute = Em.Route.extend({
  model: function() {
    return App.Patient.create({
      name: "Bert"
    });
  }
});

The working fiddle is at: http://jsfiddle.net/NXA2S/23/

Let me explain it a bit:

  • When you go to /, you are entering the automatic index route. All you need to do to show something on the screen for that route is to implement an index template. The easiest way to do that when you're getting up and running is to put your template in your index.html. Later, you will probably want to use build tools (see my answer here for more information).
  • You can control what model is displayed in a route's template by overriding the model hook in its route handler. In the case of index, the route handler is App.IndexRoute. In this case, the model is a brand new App.Patient.

You will probably want to implement controllers and events. You can learn more about the router on the Ember.js website

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome thanks! When do you override the model and when do you override setupController? Doing the extra work was a bit on purpose though. I developed a ember app somewhere last year. And I wanted to get to grips with the latest version. –  albertjan Jan 11 '13 at 8:18
1  
You override model to specify which model your route represents (it becomes the model property of your controller). You override setupController to set up other properties on your controller that you want your template to have access to. –  Yehuda Katz Jan 12 '13 at 1:44

So the new router does solve this problem and does feel a bit shinier.

I finaly found out how to do this basic example this is what happens in the router:

App.Router.map(function (match) {
  match('/').to('extendedPatient');
});

This what needs to happen in the views:

ExtendedPatientView: Em.View.extend({
    classNames: ['patient-view', 'extended'],
    //You need to specify the defaultTemplate because you extend the view class
    //instead on initializing it.
    defaultTemplate: Em.Handlebars.compile('{{name}}')
}),

You do not have to defer the readiness in the app the new router fixes that.

And in the route you do not need to specify the renderTemplates so the router now looks like:

App.ExtendedPatientRoute = Em.Route.extend({
  setupController: function (controller) {
    controller.set('content', App.Patient.create({
      name: "Bert"
    }));
  },
});

http://jsfiddle.net/NXA2S/28/

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