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I am trying to access bit fields:

Below is the code which works fine and gives expected result but throws compiler warnings which I have mentioned below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>


struct status_type_one{
unsigned delta_cts : 1;// lsb
unsigned delta_dsr : 1;
unsigned tr_edge : 1 ;
unsigned delta_rec : 1;
unsigned cts : 1;
unsigned dsr : 1;
unsigned ring : 1;
unsigned rec_line : 1;// msb
} status_one;

struct status_type_two {
unsigned : 4; // lsb 4 bits
unsigned cts : 1; //bit 5
unsigned dsr : 1; // bit 6
} status_two;



int main(void)
{
  status_one.delta_cts=1;
  status_one.delta_dsr=0;
  status_one.tr_edge=1;
  status_one.delta_rec=0;
  status_one.cts=1;
  status_one.dsr=0;
  status_one.ring=1;
  status_one.rec_line=1;

  printf("The value of status_one is %x\n",status_one);  // warning here

  status_two.cts=1;
  status_two.dsr=1;

  printf("The value of status_one is %d\n",status_two);  // warning here



    return 0;
    }

But I am getting below warning:

$ gcc -Wall Bit_Fields.c -o Bit_Fields
Bit_Fields.c: In function `main':
Bit_Fields.c:35: warning: unsigned int format, status_type_one arg (arg 2)
Bit_Fields.c:35: warning: unsigned int format, status_type_one arg (arg 2)
Bit_Fields.c:40: warning: int format, status_type_two arg (arg 2)
Bit_Fields.c:40: warning: int format, status_type_two arg (arg 2)

The Output is correct as shown below

$ ./Bit_Fields
The value of status_one is d5
The value of status_one is 48

Can anyone please tell, What the warning is about and how to resolve it?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Could you highlight the two lines. –  Ed Heal Jan 10 '13 at 9:36
1  
%u instead of %d and %x and use typecase to unsigned –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 10 '13 at 9:39
1  
%d expects an int`, not a struct status_type_one... –  Kerrek SB Jan 10 '13 at 9:39
    
%u gives same warning. –  Gaurav K Jan 10 '13 at 9:41
    
printf doesn't do structs, you have to print fields matching the format specifiers. –  Bo Persson Jan 10 '13 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The typical way to solve this is to have an integer-type union value, e.g:

union status_type_one
{
   struct status_type_one{
       unsigned delta_cts : 1;// lsb
       unsigned delta_dsr : 1;
       unsigned tr_edge : 1 ;
       unsigned delta_rec : 1;
       unsigned cts : 1;
       unsigned dsr : 1;
       unsigned ring : 1;
       unsigned rec_line : 1;// msb
   } bits;
   unsigned whole[1];       // Size should match the total bits size.
} status_one;

Now, your other code would have to change:

status_one.bits.delta_cts=1;
status_one.bits.delta_dsr=0;
status_one.bits.tr_edge=1;
... etc ...

and the print:

printf("The value of status_one is %x\n",status_one.whole[0]);

[Obviously, if the struct is more than one item in whole, you need to either loop or pass several values to printf]

What you are doing may well appear to work, but you are not really supposed to pass a STRUCT to a printf function, and there's no telling what that does if you use more than one machine word worth of data, or what happens on a 64-bit machine, etc, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
why array whole[1] , you can use just whole, ? –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 10 '13 at 9:44
    
Because that won't explain in the same section how to deal with structs that are larger than one <integer type>. If they always are less than 32-bit, then by all means use no array - but the compiler should optimise that away anyways as long as it's a constant. –  Mats Petersson Jan 10 '13 at 9:46
    
@MatsPetersson, could you use whole[]? –  Richard Jan 10 '13 at 9:51
    
@Richard Not in a union. You need a size there. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 10 '13 at 10:14
    
Just one mention: Struct and union namae can not be same.. it is throwing error –  Gaurav K Jan 10 '13 at 17:22

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