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Is there a neat way to inject failures in a Python script? I'd like to avoid sprinkling the source code with stuff like:

failure_ABC = True
failure_XYZ = True
def inject_failure_ABC():
    raise Exception('ha! a fake error')
def inject_failure_XYZ():
    # delete some critical file
    pass

# some real code
if failure_ABC:
    inject_failure_ABC()
# some more real code
if failure_XYZ:
    inject_failure_XYZ()
# even more real code

Edit: I have the following idea: insert "failure points" as specially-crafted comments. The write a simple parser that will be called before the Python interpreter, and will produce the actual instrumented Python script with the actual failure code. E.g:

#!/usr/bin/parser_script_producing_actual_code_and_calls python
# some real code
# FAIL_123
if foo():
    # FAIL_ABC
    execute_some_real_code()
else:
    # FAIL_XYZ
    execute_some_other_real_code()

Anything starting with FAIL_ is considered as a failure point by the script, and depending on a configuration file the failure is enabled/disabled. What do you think?

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Not certain what you are trying to achieve here. Are you testing for failure cases? Then recreate the circumstances that lead to the failure for the test, including using mock objects for the test-subject to interact with. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 10 '13 at 10:24
    
If you don't "sprinkle" the code, how should it know where to have the potential failure? –  glglgl Jan 10 '13 at 10:29

3 Answers 3

You could use mocking libraries, for example unittest.mock, there also exist many third party ones as well. You can then mock some object used by your code such that it throws your exception or behaves in whatever way you want it to.

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As commented to my original post, this is too coarse grained for me. –  Thanos Jan 11 '13 at 9:53

When testing error handling, the best approach is to isolate the code that can throw errors in a new method which you can override in a test:

class ToTest:
    def foo(...):
        try:
            self.bar() # We want to test the error handling in foo()
        except:
            ....

    def bar(self):
        ... production code ...

In your test case, you can extend ToTest and override bar() with code that throws the exceptions that you want to test.

EDIT You should really consider splitting large methods into smaller ones. It will make the code easier to test, to understand and to maintain. Have a look at Test Driven Development for some ideas how to change your development process.

Regarding your idea to use "Failure Comments". This looks like a good solution. There is one small problem: You will have to write your own Python parser because Python doesn't keep comments when it produces bytecode.

So you can either spend a couple of weeks to write this or a couple of weeks to make your code easier to test.

There is one difference, though: If you don't go all the way, the parser will be useless. Also, the time spent won't have improved one bit of your code. Most of the effort will go into the parser and tools. So after all that time, you will still have to improve the code, add failure comments and write the tests.

With refactoring the code, you can stop whenever you want but the time spent so far will be meaningful and not wasted. Your code will start to get better with the first change you make and it will keep improving.

Writing a complex tool takes time and it will have it's own bugs which need to fix or work around. None of this will improve your situation in the short term and you don't have a guarantee that it will improve the long term.

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I've though of this but I'm afraid it's too coarse grained and cumbersome: For larger methods, I need to duplicate the code up to the point where I want to inject the failure. I want to be able to specify a source code line that may fail. –  Thanos Jan 11 '13 at 9:44
    
Specifying a source line where Python should throw an error looks like a simple solution but it won't work: As soon as you edit your code, you will have to update for all lines below. So a single change could force you to update all tests. Better solution: Split up large methods into smaller ones. That will make the code easier to test and solve your problem (plus it will improve the quality in general). –  Aaron Digulla Jan 11 '13 at 10:02
1  
To say this differently: You're caught in the trap that it might be possible to shape tests for broken code. That never works. Code has to be written in such a way that it can be tested. Have a look at Test Driven Development for some ideas how to change your development process. –  Aaron Digulla Jan 11 '13 at 10:04
1  
Update re your idea to use "Failure Comments". This looks like a good solution. There is one small problem: You will have to write your own Python parser because Python doesn't keep comments when it produces bytecode. So you can either spend a couple of weeks to write this or a couple of weeks to make your code easier to test. There is one difference, though: If you don't go all the way, the parser will be useless. With refactoring the code, you can stop any time and keep the revenue you generated so far. –  Aaron Digulla Jan 11 '13 at 10:08
    
I'm afraid that if I attempt to write the code in a more "testable" way I'll end up writing a couple of statements per method, which will be a pain to read and maintain. In general your approach should work but in the project I'm working on we care a lot about crash consistency, so we need to assume that failures can occur practically anywhere, any time. (continued) –  Thanos Jan 11 '13 at 10:58

If you only want to stop your code at some point, and fall back to interactive interpreter, one can use:

assert 1==0

But this only works if you do not run python with -O

Edit Actually, my first answer was to quick, without really understanding what you want to do, sorry.

Maybe your code becomes already more readable if you do parameterization through parameters, not through variable/function suffices. Something like

failure = {"ABC": False, "XYZ":False}

#Do something, maybe set failure

def inject_failure(failure):
    if not any(failure.values()):
        return
    if failure["ABC"]:
        raise Exception('ha! a fake error')
    elif failure["XYZ"]:
        # delete some critical file
        pass

inject_failure(failure)
share|improve this answer
    
that's not what he wants. –  Karoly Horvath Jan 10 '13 at 10:25
    
I'm afraid you're right. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 10 '13 at 10:26
    
This doesn't do what I want: I still sprinkle the code with irrelevant statements and does not offer flexibility w.r.t. the injected failure (e.g. I can't delete that critical file in my example). –  Thanos Jan 10 '13 at 10:26
    
I adjusted my solution to hopefully go towards the direction the OP asked for. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 10 '13 at 11:19

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