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I am trying to read in this fixed-width file in R. I want to read in only the first 3 columns with lengths 2, 2 and 6, such that the second variable has the value "A". Note that the second variable has two spaces but is actually only one character. I am using this command:

b = trim(read.csv(pipe("awk -v FIELDWIDTHS='2 2 6' -v OFS=',' '($2=='A '){ $1=$1 ''; print }'</path/rawk.txt"),header=F))

I am getting this error:

awk: cmd. line:1: ($2==A
awk: cmd. line:1:       ^ unexpected newline or end of string
Error in read.table(file = file, header = header, sep = sep, quote = quote,  : 
  no lines available in input

If I remove the empty space in 'A ':

b = trim(read.csv(pipe("awk -v FIELDWIDTHS='2 2 6' -v OFS=',' '($2=='A'){ $1=$1 ''; print }'</path/rawk.txt"),header=F))

I still get this error:

Error in read.table(file = file, header = header, sep = sep, quote = quote,  : 
  no lines available in input

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Have a look at read.fwf. –  EDi Jan 10 '13 at 10:42
    
The linked file is a subset of a huge file. That's why I'm trying to parse first in awk and then read in what I need in R. –  user702432 Jan 10 '13 at 10:59
    
There are some examples of using gawk with read.csv.sql of the sqldf package in FAQ 13 and 14 on the sqldf package home page: code.google.com/p/sqldf –  G. Grothendieck Jan 10 '13 at 12:24
    
If I run that awk line outside of R I get no output, so there's something in the awk wrong. –  Spacedman Jan 10 '13 at 14:03
    
You've got lots of single quote marks inside single quote marks... You need to escape some of them... –  Spacedman Jan 10 '13 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This seems to work:

read.csv(pipe("awk -v FIELDWIDTHS='2 2 6' -v OFS=',' '($2==\"A \"){ $1=$1 \'\'; print }'<rawk.txt"),header=FALSE)


  V1 V2    V3
1 10 A  10001
2 10 A  10002
3 10 A  10003

But I'm not sure what the $1=$1 is all about...

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1  
$1=$1 is an AWK idiom to force recalculating $0 (whole line) from $1, $2, …, $n using current field separator. Any assignment to $k forces this operation, but sometimes you don't want to change any field. Therefore, $1=$1. –  liori Jan 10 '13 at 14:26
    
Many thanks, Ghoti and Spacedman. The strange thing is that that exact code worked perfectly on another file. –  user702432 Jan 10 '13 at 15:59

For something this simple, could you not more easily look at a substring of the line rather than considering the "real" fixed-width fields within it?

b = trim(read.csv(pipe("awk 'substr($0,3,2)==\"A \"' /path/rawk.txt"),header=F))
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