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I've seen a few questions on this topic, but I haven't been able to find a definitive answer.

I would like to know the proper way to use old-style classes in a new Python code base. Let's say for example that I have two fixed classes, A and B. If I want to subclass A and B, and convert to new-style classes (A2 and B2), this works. However there is an issue if I want to create a new class C, from A2 and B2.

Therefore, is it possible to continue with this method, or do all classes have to conform to the old-style if any base class is defined as old-style?

See the example code for clarification:

class A:
   def __init__(self):
      print 'class A'

class B:
   def __init__(self):
      print 'class B'

class A2(A,object):
   def __init__(self):
      super(A2, self).__init__()
      print 'class A2'

class B2(B,object):
   def __init__(self):
      super(B2, self).__init__()
      print 'class B2'

class C(A2, B2):
   def __init__(self):
      super(C,self).__init__()
      print 'class C'

A2()
print '---'
B2()
print '---'
C()

The output of this code:

class A
class A2
---
class B
class B2
---
class A
class A2
class C

As you can see, the problem is that in the call to C(), class B2 was never initialized.


Update - New-Style Class Example

I guess it is not clear what the correct initialization sequence should be when using super. Here is a working example where a call to super does initialize all base classes, not just the first one it finds.

class A(object):
   def __init__(self):
      super(A, self).__init__()
      print 'class A'

class B(object):
   def __init__(self):
      super(B, self).__init__()
      print 'class B'

class A2(A):
   def __init__(self):
      super(A2, self).__init__()
      print 'class A2'

class B2(B):
   def __init__(self):
      super(B2, self).__init__()
      print 'class B2'

class C(A2, B2):
   def __init__(self):
      super(C, self).__init__()
      print 'class C'

C()

and produces the output:

class B
class B2
class A
class A2
class C
share|improve this question
    
Updated answer to include explanation of diamond inheritance and the problem solved with new-style classes. –  Lennart Regebro Sep 15 '09 at 10:40
    
Why do you even have old-style classes in the first place? –  S.Lott Sep 15 '09 at 10:52
    
Third-party modules, maybe? –  Lennart Regebro Sep 15 '09 at 13:23
1  
Well, true, but then you have to fix it again when the author updates the third-party module. Besides, he doesn't actually have a problem. :) –  Lennart Regebro Sep 15 '09 at 15:51
1  
This was mentioned before, but it is painful to maintain a customized version of 3rd-party libraries. If there is any way to avoid this, then I would prefer that. –  Casey Sep 16 '09 at 23:18

2 Answers 2

This is not a issue of mixing old and new style classes. super() does not call all base classes functions, it calls the first one it finds according the method resolution order. In this case A2, which in turn calls A.

If you want to call both, do so explicitly:

class C(A2, B2):
   def __init__(self):
      A2.__init__(self)
      B2.__init__(self)
      print 'class C'

That should solve it.

Update:

The diamond inheritance problem as you refer to, is the question of which class to call in a diamond inheritance situation, like this:

class A:
   def method1(self):
      print 'class A'

   def method2(self):
      print 'class A'

class B(A):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class B'

class C(A):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class C'

   def method2(self):
      print 'class C'

class D(B, C):
   pass

Now test this out:

>>> D().method1()
'class B'

This is correct. It calls the first class' implementation. However, let's try this with method2:

>>> D().method2()
'class A'

Oups, WRONG! It should have called class C.method2() here, because even though class B does not override method2, class C does. Now make class A a newstyle class:

class A(object):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class A'

And try again:

>>> D().method1()
'class B'
>>> D().method2()
'class C'

and hey presto, it works. This is the method resolution order difference between new and old-style classes, and this is what sometimes makes it confusing to mix them.

Notice how at no point both B and C gets called. This is true even if we call super.

class D(B, C):
   def method1(self):
      super(D, self).method1()

   def method2(self):
      super(D, self).method2()

>>> D().method1()
'class B'
>>> D().method2()
'class C'

If you want to call both B and C, you MUST call both explicitly.

Now if you unbreak the diamond, like in your example having separate base classes, the result is different:

class A1(object):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class A1'

   def method2(self):
      print 'class A1'

class A2(object):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class A2'

   def method2(self):
      print 'class A2'

class B(A1):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class B'

class C(A2):
   def method1(self):
      print 'class C'

   def method2(self):
      print 'class C'

class D(B, C):
   def method1(self):
      super(D, self).method1()

   def method2(self):
      super(D, self).method2()


>>> D().method1()
'class B'
>>> D().method2()
'class A1'

This is also per design. Still nowhere two base classes gets called. If you want that to happen you still have to call both explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
Super will call all base class methods if implemented with all new-style classes and used consistently. My question is how to handle the case when you are forced to mix in an old-style class. I am aware of how to directly call the parent methods, but this breaks for diamond inheritance. –  Casey Sep 15 '09 at 9:18
    
No it won't. If you make A and B new-style classes, you get exactly the same result as above. And I don't see how it would break break diamond inheritance to directly call the call the parent methods. I suspect you have the diamond inheritance problem slightly backwards. In fact, you seem to assume that diamond inheritance should call both base classes (which it typically does not) and the only way to do that in Python is to call them explicitly. –  Lennart Regebro Sep 15 '09 at 10:05
    
See my update, super executes all _init_ methods. –  Casey Sep 15 '09 at 19:27
1  
No it doesn't. It executes one. But in your new example, that one calls another one, that calls another one that calls another one, etc, until all have been called. Since old-style classes doesn't have super, obviously you can't do it with super. So again: You need to be explicit. –  Lennart Regebro Sep 15 '09 at 19:48
1  
No, the answer is exhaustive. It's not complicated at all. And super() does not call all the methods of all the parent classes, not even in a cooperative chain. Claiming so is confusing, complicated and in fundamental ways incorrect. –  Lennart Regebro Oct 22 '11 at 16:39

Generally, old-style classes are unmaintained libraries

This is an inaccurate generalization, which is especially in evidence now, 2 years later.

It's worth noting that the Twisted codebase contains myriads of old style classes, and the issue of how to mix the two with a minimum of headaches is still very relevant and unanswered well by this thread. The simple answer "well, just change the 3rd-party library" is impractical for such a large codebase as Twisted, and having some rules about how to mix old and new classes would be useful.

Does anybody have an up-to-date view on what some of the guidelines implementers should use when they are forced to derive subclasses from popular (and currently maintained) codebases which are dominated by old-style classes??

share|improve this answer
    
while your statements are true, your are not answering the question, and you are asking a new question in your answer. Try to remember that this is not a forum: the goal here is to provide a correct answer to the OP. –  Simon Sep 30 '11 at 16:09
    
Thanks, Simon. I wasn't intending to create a discussion. I was indicating that (a) the original question is still valid and important and trying to (b) encourage somebody to answer rather than discounting the original question with a "fix them to new-style" answer, which doesn't help. I'm new here. When I find an answer, I will post it here. –  GaryWiz Oct 17 '11 at 22:22

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