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I want to convert a string to a given generic type T. It may be either basic type or string (e.g. int or string), or an array of a basic types or strings (e.g. int[] or string[]). I have the following function:

T Str2Val<T>(string str)
{
  return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
}

It works well for basic types. But it fails for T being an array E[] and str being a comma-separated list of values.

I can easily check whether T is an array with typeof(T).IsArray. Then I have two solutions: parse an array in the same function with a scalar, like the following:

  if (!typeof(T).IsArray)
  {
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
  }
  else
  {
    // Handle an array
  }

or implement two overloaded functions: one for generic T and second for generic E[]. However, both of solutions fail. I cannot use any array-specific code in the else-clause since it must be compatible with a scalar. And C# cannot pick proper overload with E[] when T is actually an array.

What should I do?

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1  
How are you going to convert string to array and to array of what? char[]? use ToCharArray. int[]? How are you going to split it: comma, dash, dot? –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 10 '13 at 11:50
    
I don't want to convert string to array. String should be converted to string (i.e. no changes). Array of strings is of now interest for my task, so whatever splitting is acceptable. Arrays of numbers should be splat with commas. –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 11:53
    
So are you trying to convert int[] to string? –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 10 '13 at 11:59
    
No, for T == int[] I'm trying to convert string to int[], like "1,2,3" to {1, 2, 3}. –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:01
1  
You should check if T implements IConvertible. Otherwise, there's no hope it will succeed with Convert.ChangeType. You could do like this: if (typeof(IConvertible).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T))) { return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T)); } /* otherwise, check if T is a collection, and so on. */. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 10 '13 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would create some listing of custom parsers that you register then later leverage since you seem to be wanting to use custom rules anyway:

public static class StringParsers
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, object> Parsers = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public static void RegisterParser<T>(Func<string, T> parseFunction)
    {
        Parsers[typeof(T)] = parseFunction;
    }

    public static T Parse<T>(string input)
    {
        object untypedParser;
        if (!Parsers.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out untypedParser))
            throw new Exception("Could not find a parser for type " + typeof(T).FullName);

        Func<string, T> parser = (Func<string, T>)untypedParser;

        return parser(input);
    }
}

During your application initialization, you would register the types you intend to use later in your application (I'm guessing this is known since you're using generics):

StringParsers.RegisterParser<string[]>(input => input.Split(','));
StringParsers.RegisterParser<int[]>(input => input.Split(',').Select(i => Int32.Parse(i)).ToArray());
StringParsers.RegisterParser<int>(input => Int32.Parse(input));

Finally, you can call it simply:

string testArrayInput = "1,2,8";

int[] integers = StringParsers.Parse<int[]>(testArrayInput); // {1, 2, 8}

string[] strings = StringParsers.Parse<string[]>(testArrayInput); // {"1", "2", "8"}

int singleInt = StringParsers.Parse<int>("9999"); //9999

Now, this is a pretty simple implementation. You may wish to extend it so instead of using type Func<string, T> it might use an IStringParser interface and you can provide deeper implementations of the parsing if necessary. Furthermore, you may wish to make it thread safe (unless you're sure that won't be an issue, or if you are sure your registration on startup is before any usages)

EDIT: If you really, really, really want it all in one function just accounting for your comma delimited array, then you can use this:

public static T Str2Val<T>(string str)
{
    if (!typeof(T).IsArray)
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));

    Type elementType = typeof(T).GetElementType();

    string[] entries = str.Split(',');
    int numberOfEntries = entries.Length;

    System.Array array = Array.CreateInstance(elementType, numberOfEntries);

    for(int i = 0; i < numberOfEntries; i++)
        array.SetValue(Convert.ChangeType(entries[i], elementType), i);

    return (T)(object)array;
}

But this feels so wrong. There must be a better way and to avoid the double generic input in Alexander's answer, but there you go.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure the conversion (Func<string, T>)untypedParser; is possible for T being an array? –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:10
    
@Mikhail Yes, The code above is tested and working. T when called is already type (for example) int[]. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 10 '13 at 12:10
    
Ok, I think it is a working solution. Though it's really high price for just being able to handle arrays, compared with my initial one-line function. Anyway, thanks for it. –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:13
    
@Mikhail I added an edit with an all-in-one function, but I don't like it. :) (also tested and working) –  Chris Sinclair Jan 10 '13 at 12:27
    
My god, it works! I have no idea why (T)(object) works while just (T) doesn't, but it's what I need! And it's the only thing I thought is impossible. Thanks a lot! –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:37

Another solution with explicit element type passing:

static T Str2Val<T>(string str)
{
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));
}

static E[] Str2Val<T, E>(string str)
    where T : ICollection<E>
{
    return str.Split(',').Select(x => (E)Convert.ChangeType(x, typeof(E))).ToArray();
}

using

Str2Val<int>("1")
Str2Val<int[], int>("1,3")
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but it requires changes in the interface of Str2Val and code duplication. –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:15

Maybe something like this will help:

dynamic Str2Val<T>(string str)
{
    if (!typeof(T).IsArray)
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(str, typeof(T));

    var elementType = typeof(T).GetElementType();
    return str.Split(',').Select(x => Convert.ChangeType(x, elementType)).ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will convert to object[], not to E[]. –  Mikhail Jan 10 '13 at 12:06

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