Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

On running the following code in groovy -

import groovy.time.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.TimeCategory
def today = new Date()
use(TimeCategory)
{
  def modifiedToday = today.plus(10.minutes)
  modifiedToday = modifiedToday.plus(10.months)
  modifiedToday = modifiedToday.plus(10.years)
  def duration = modifiedToday - today
  println duration.years
  println duration.months
  println duration.days
  println duration.minutes
}

I am getting the following output -

0
0
3956
10

Please suggest, why am I getting years and months as 0 and all the value in days. How do I get the value in years and months?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How would you get it in months?

Each month has a different number of days, so what would you do?

You can get back the date this represents from now by doing:

println duration.from.now

Or, you can get the date that represents in the past by doing:

println duration.ago

And I guess you could work it out from there, but there is no in-built functionality for normalising a TimeDuration based on a given date


Edit

This sort of thing rolls from one date in the past to the specified date. I haven't done any real testing on it though, so you should take care and test the life out of it before using it in anything important...

import static java.util.Calendar.*
import groovy.time.DatumDependentDuration
import groovy.time.TimeCategory

DatumDependentDuration getAge( Date dob, Date now = new Date() ) {
  dob.clearTime()
  now.clearTime()
  assert dob < now
  Calendar.instance.with { c ->
    c.time = dob
    def (years, months, days) = [ 0, 0, 0 ]

    while( ( c[ YEAR ] < now[ YEAR ] - 1 ) || 
           ( c[ YEAR ] < now[ YEAR ] && c[ MONTH ] <= now[ MONTH ] ) ) {
      c.add( YEAR, 1 )
      years++
    }

    while( ( c[ YEAR ] < now[ YEAR ] ) ||
           ( c[ MONTH ] < now[ MONTH ] && c[ DAY_OF_MONTH ] <= now[ DAY_OF_MONTH ] ) ) {
      // Catch when we are wrapping the DEC/JAN border and would end up beyond now
      if( c[ YEAR ] == now[ YEAR ] - 1 &&
          now[ MONTH ] == JANUARY && c[ MONTH ] == DECEMBER &&
          c[ DAY_OF_MONTH ] > now[ DAY_OF_MONTH ] ) {
        break
      }
      c.add( MONTH, 1 )
      months++
    }

    while( c[ DAY_OF_YEAR ] != now[ DAY_OF_YEAR ] ) {
      c.add( DAY_OF_YEAR, 1 )
      days++
    }

    new DatumDependentDuration( years, months, days, 0, 0, 0, 0 )
  }
}

println getAge( Date.parse( 'dd/MM/yyyy', '11/10/2000' ) )

// Prints: '12 years, 2 months, 30 days'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 "Each month has a different number of days, so what would you do?" –  Will P Jan 10 '13 at 12:38
    
For example, let's say, I want to calculate the age (on this day) in years/months/days for a person and I have his date of birth with me. –  SoftEngi Jan 10 '13 at 12:41
    
@SoftEngi Wrote a function to do that... There are probably cleaner ways, and as I said I have done minimal testing on it (The case shown is the only test, and I believe it is right) –  tim_yates Jan 10 '13 at 14:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.