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I'm trying to replace certain words in a long string. What happens is some words stay the same and some change. The words that don't change seem to get the matcher stuck in an infinite loop as it keeps trying to do the same action on words that are meant to stay the same. Below is an example similar to mine - I couldn't put the exact code that I'm using because it's far more detailed and would take up too much space I'm afraid.

public String test() {
    String temp = "<p><img src=\"logo.jpg\"/></p>\n<p>CANT TOUCH THIS!</p>";
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(<p(\\s.+)?>(.+)?</p>)");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder(temp);
    int start;
    int end;
    String match;

    while (matcher.find()) {
        start = matcher.start();
        end = matcher.end();
        match = temp.substring(start, end);
        stringBuilder.replace(start, end, changeWords(match));
        temp = stringBuilder.toString();
        matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
        System.out.println("This is the word I'm getting stuck on: " + match);
    }
    return temp;
}

public String changeWords(String words) {
    return "<p><img src=\"logo.jpg\"/></p>";
}

Any suggestions as to why this might be happening?

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5 Answers 5

You reinitialize the matcher in the loop.

Remove the matcher = pattern.matcher(temp); instruction in your while loop and you should not be stuck any more.

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It does resolve the infinite loop but if I take out that line then the matcher doesn't update to use the new temp string so it misplaces the replacements because it gets the start and end indexes wrong. (It's identifying matches & indexes from the old temp string not the new one) –  ThreaT Jan 11 '13 at 8:27
    
Your code is still wrong for other reasons you need to find out. This just solved the "infinite loop" you asked for. –  Vakh Jan 11 '13 at 8:32
    
This solution works but it breaks something else in order to work which means I have to revert to an infinite loop, so it's not resolved yet... –  ThreaT Jan 11 '13 at 8:33
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You are using Matcher wrong. Your while loop reads:

while (matcher.find()) {
     start = matcher.start();
     end = matcher.end();
     match = temp.substring(start, end);
     stringBuilder.replace(start, end, changeWords(match));
     temp = stringBuilder.toString();
     matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
}

it should just be:

matcher.replaceAll(temp, "new text");

No "while" loop, it is unnecessary. A matcher will not replace text it does not match and it will do the right job with regards to not matching twice at the same place etc -- no need to spoonfeed it.

What is more, your regex can do without the capturing parens. And if you only want to replace "words" (regexes have no notion of words), add word anchors around the text to be matched:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\btext\\b");
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Problem is that I need the start and end variables. They contain indexes that get passed in other areas of the code. If I use replaceAll then I have no access to those parameters anymore. –  ThreaT Jan 10 '13 at 12:43
    
You did not say that in the initial question, in your code extract I only see them as being used for replacement indices in the StringBuilder (which the matcher itself can do) –  fge Jan 10 '13 at 12:46
    
Okay you're right, sorry man –  ThreaT Jan 10 '13 at 12:49
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You are looking to match "text" word and again replacing that word either with "text" (if condition in changeWord()) or "new text" (else in changeWord()). That whay it's causing infinite loop.

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I know. The example I placed above has that on purpose to illustrate the fact that some words might remain the same but that the matcher should move onto the next match instead of idling on the same one. –  ThreaT Jan 10 '13 at 12:41
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Why are you using Matcher at all? You don't need regex to replace words, just use replace():

input.replace("oldtext", "newtext"); // replace all occurrences of old with new 
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It's to find the indexes of the words it's replacing –  ThreaT Jan 10 '13 at 12:51
    
However, this will also replace iamoldtext with newtext –  fge Jan 10 '13 at 12:51
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I fixed it simply by adding this line:

if (!match.equals(changeWords(match))) {
     matcher = pattern.matcher(temp);
}
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