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Summary

Array [A - B - - - C] in device memory but want [A B C] - what's the quickest way with CUDA C?

Context

I have an array A of integers on device (GPU) memory. At each iteration, I randomly choose a few elements that are larger than 0 and subtract 1 from them. I maintain a sorted lookup array L of those elements that are equal to 0:

Array A:
       @ iteration i: [0 1 0 3 3 2 0 1 2 3]
   @ iteration i + 1: [0 0 0 3 2 2 0 1 2 3]

Lookup for 0-elements L:
       @ iteration i: [0 - 2 - - - 6 - - -]  ->  want compacted form: [0 2 6]
   @ iteration i + 1: [0 1 2 - - - 6 - - -]  ->  want compacted form: [0 1 2 6]

(Here, I randomly chose elements 1 and 4 to subtract 1 from. In my implementation in CUDA C, each thread maps onto an element in A, and so the lookup array is sparse to prevent data races and to maintain a sorted ordering (e.g. [0 1 2 6] rather than [0 2 6 1]).)

Later, I will do some operation only for those elements that are equal to 0. Hence I need to compact my sparse lookup array L, so that I can map threads to 0-elements.

As such, what is the most efficient way to compact a sparse array on device memory with CUDA C?

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
You might consider using thrust stream compaction. –  Robert Crovella Jan 10 '13 at 12:45
    
Thanks - does thrust come with the standard CUDA installation? As I'm not the system administrator, how can I check on a Unix machine if the library is available? Thanks. –  Milo Chen Jan 10 '13 at 12:56
    
Yes, it does, assuming a recent version of CUDA. If you have a directory like /usr/local/cuda/include/thrust then you have thrust. Thrust is entirely templated/included code, so there are no ordinary libraries to worry about. You might be interested in the quick start guide. –  Robert Crovella Jan 10 '13 at 13:07
    
Thanks @RobertCrovella, but I can't see any example usage for C users - only C++ which I'm not familiar with. For instance, how would you even call thrust::copy_if() on an array in device memory in CUDA C? –  Milo Chen Jan 10 '13 at 18:47
    
cuSPARSE library provide cusparseSdense2csr() to convert matrix from dense to sparse format. It should be very efficient, but maybe less efficient than thrust::copy_if –  Eric Jan 10 '13 at 18:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suppose I have:

int V[] = {1, 2, 0, 0, 5};

And my desired result is:

int R[] = {1, 2, 5}

In effect we are removing elements that are zero, or copying elements only if non-zero.

#include <thrust/device_ptr.h>
#include <thrust/copy.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 5

#define cudaCheckErrors(msg) \
    do { \
        cudaError_t __err = cudaGetLastError(); \
        if (__err != cudaSuccess) { \
            fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error: %s (%s at %s:%d)\n", \
                msg, cudaGetErrorString(__err), \
                __FILE__, __LINE__); \
            fprintf(stderr, "*** FAILED - ABORTING\n"); \
            exit(1); \
        } \
    } while (0)

  struct is_not_zero
  {
    __host__ __device__
    bool operator()(const int x)
    {
      return (x != 0);
    }
  };



int main(){

  int V[] = {1, 2, 0, 0, 5};
  int R[] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
  int *d_V, *d_R;

  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_V, SIZE*sizeof(int));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc1 fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_R, SIZE*sizeof(int));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc2 fail");

  cudaMemcpy(d_V, V, SIZE*sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy1 fail");

  thrust::device_ptr<int> dp_V(d_V);
  thrust::device_ptr<int> dp_R(d_R);
  thrust::copy_if(dp_V, dp_V + SIZE, dp_R, is_not_zero());

  cudaMemcpy(R, d_R, SIZE*sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy2 fail");

  for (int i = 0; i<3; i++)
    printf("R[%d]: %d\n", i, R[i]);

  return 0;


}

the struct defintion provides us with a functor that tests for zero elements. Note that in thrust, there are no kernels and we are not writing device code directly. All that happens behind the scenes. And I'd definitely suggest familiarizing yourself with the quick start guide, so as not to turn this question into a tutorial on thrust.

After reviewing the comments, I think this modified version of the code will work around the cuda 4.0 issues:

#include <thrust/device_ptr.h>
#include <thrust/copy.h>
#include <thrust/device_vector.h>
#include <thrust/host_vector.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 5

  struct is_not_zero
  {
    __host__ __device__
    bool operator()(const int x)
    {
      return (x != 0);
    }
  };



int main(){

  int V[] = {1, 2, 0, 0, 5};
  int R[] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

  thrust::host_vector<int> h_V(V, V+SIZE);
  thrust::device_vector<int> d_V = h_V;
  thrust::device_vector<int> d_R(SIZE, 0);

  thrust::copy_if(d_V.begin(), d_V.end(), d_R.begin(), is_not_zero());
  thrust::host_vector<int> h_R = d_R;

  thrust::copy(h_R.begin(), h_R.end(), R);

  for (int i = 0; i<3; i++)
    printf("R[%d]: %d\n", i, R[i]);

  return 0;


}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I tried your solution, but get compile error: [...]/cuda/4.0.17/cuda/bin/../include/thrust/detail/device/cuda/copy_i‌​f.inl(7‌​1): error: more than one instance of overloaded function "min" matches the argument list: function "min(int, int)" function "min(unsigned int, unsigned int)" [...] argument types are: (long, const long) detected during: instantiation of "void thrust::detail::device::cuda::reduce_intervals<CTA_SIZE,InputIterator,IndexType,‌​‌​OutputIterator,BinaryFunction>(InputIterator, IndexType, IndexType, OutputIterator, BinaryFunction) [...] where, [...] are truncations. –  Milo Chen Jan 10 '13 at 22:28
    
You took the code I posted, exactly, and tried to compile it? Or did you make any changes or additions? It looks like you're using CUDA 4.0. I have tested it on cuda 4.2 and cuda 5.0, but not 4.0 –  Robert Crovella Jan 11 '13 at 0:43
    
Thanks Robert, I compiled the code exactly as you posted. Any ideas why CUDA 4.0's complaining? –  Milo Chen Jan 11 '13 at 2:26
    
cuda 4 is pretty old. Over 2 years old now. Try adding -m32 to your nvcc compile command line. –  Robert Crovella Jan 11 '13 at 3:22
    
Cheers. Now I get the error: In file included from /usr/include/features.h:371, from [...]/cuda/4.0.17/cuda/bin/../include/host_config.h:114, from [...]/cuda/4.0.17/cuda/bin/../include/cuda_runtime.h:59, from <command-line>:0: /usr/include/gnu/stubs.h:7:27: error: gnu/stubs-32.h: No such file or directory. Thanks for your patience. –  Milo Chen Jan 11 '13 at 3:26

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