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I've got the following problem. Suppose, that there is a class, which contains a private class, which have to be tested. To cut off unnecessary comments and answers, yes it has to stay private and yes, it have to be tested.

Say, it looks like this:

public class PublicClass
{
    private class InternalClass
    {
        void Method() { }
    }
}

For ease and convenience of testing, I would like to create the following class:

public class InternalClassAccess
{
    private object instance;

    public InternalClassAccess()
    {
        // Use reflections to instantiate InternalClass
        // and store it in instance field
    }

    public void Method()
    {
        // Use reflections to call Method() on
        // stored instance
    }
}

I can write such class manually, but I wonder, if there is some kind of automatic way of doing so? I have Professional version of VS 2012.

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2  
"yes it has to stay private" -- If it has to stay private, but it also has to be accessible outside of PublicClass, something is wrong with your design. You don't explain why it has to be private, and I cannot imagine why it would be a problem to make it internal. –  hvd Jan 10 '13 at 13:08
1  
plus if it is internal, you could add [InternalsVisibleTo(...)] and specify your test project; then your test project has access. –  Marc Gravell Jan 10 '13 at 13:10
    
It should not be accessible outside the PublicClass in terms of the project. On the other hand, I wish to test it, so i have to gain access to this class (or other private members). Imagine a huge class with one method DoSomethingComplicatedAndExtremelySpecific and 100s of small, private methods, which do something even more extremely specific (so they should not be visible and shouldn't be extracted), but what influences the final result (so they should be tested). I explicitly wrote the not's to cut off comments about privacy of methods and need of test. Please accept these facts. –  Spook Jan 10 '13 at 13:22
    
@Spook: That sounds like something which could do with being refactored anyway. Heck, it sounds like it could be a whole separate assembly, with a single public class and loads of internal ones - which you could then test using InternalsVisibleTo. –  Jon Skeet Jan 10 '13 at 13:31
    
Imagine the class JPeg, which allows you to compress and save raw byte[] into file as Jpeg. This class belongs to bigger assembly with similar classes: Png, Tiff etc. Class exports two public methods: Save and Load, but contains a few private methods, which actually does the work. They shouldn't be internal, because noone despite this class uses them. Would you test these or not? –  Spook Jan 10 '13 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know of anything built into .NET for this - but you can write your class once for all such classes using dynamic. You'd have a structure something like this:

public class PrivateDynamicAccessor : DynamicObject
{
    private readonly object instance;

    public PrivateDynamicAccessor(string typeName)
    {
        // Instantiate here via reflection
    }

    public override bool TryGetMember(GetMemberBinder binder,
                                      out Object result)
    {
        // Access the fields or properties with reflection
    }
}

(Likewise TryInvokeMember for methods, etc.)

Then you can use it as:

dynamic foo = new PrivateDynamicAccessor("Foo.Bar+Baz");
string name = foo.Name;
// etc

(I agree with the comment that it's odd to have to do this, mind you. You really can't make it internal?)

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You really can't make it internal? - Making this class internal instead of private is like modifying serial body of a car, such that a crash-cam can be mounted inside. Don't you think, that modifying architecture of program to fit unit testing is wrong? –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 6:54
    
@Spook: Not really - the fact that you can't unit test it is a code smell. The fact that you've got "a huge class with one method DoSomethingComplicatedAndExtremelySpecific and 100s of small, private methods" is a code smell, IMO. It doesn't sound sufficiently focused to me. –  Jon Skeet Jan 11 '13 at 7:03
    
I would answer here, "one size does not fit all". Currently I'm performing quite complicated image analysis and my class is a black box - it receives image and returns some data extracted from it. However the process is very specific and quite complicated, so there are really many private specific methods, that shouldn't be exposed, but should be tested. Suppose for a moment, that these methods are private as an architecture requirement of the project - would you test them? Or expose to bigger audience by making them internal? –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 7:10
    
Imagine a car engine - it's a huge piece of technology, but its "public interface" is just: turn the key, it starts to rotate; press the accelerator pedal, it rotates faster. All its parts are hidden inside (private). The class I'm talking about is quite similar, but I think, that there are much more cases, when such decision to hide many methods by making them private is judged. –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 7:14
    
Car parts might be 'hidden' in the car but many parts are replaceable, autonomous objects with public interfaces. –  Erno de Weerd Jan 11 '13 at 7:39

You could use some preprocessing directives:

public class PublicClass
{
    #if DEBUG
    public class InternalClass
    #else
    private class InternalClass
    #endif
    {
        void Method() { }
    }
}

//Only valid when testing in Debug
public class TestableInternalClass : PublicClass.InternalClass
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
As much as I hate to use macros and compiler directives, this is actually quite a good idea, because it keeps the encapsulation on the project level (eg. you may have special directive only for tests). I'd consider that a last resort tool, though. –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 5:16

In Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate you can just right-click the method/constructor and pick generate test. This will create an Accessor class for the outer class that allows you to access the private inner class.

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Unfortunately, I have no such option in the context menu. Which version of Visual Studio do you have? –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 5:14
    
I tested this in Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate. –  Erno de Weerd Jan 11 '13 at 7:35
    
Unfortunately, I have Professional version of VS; I guess, that this functionality is available in Test Suite and Ultimate versions only... –  Spook Jan 11 '13 at 7:36

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