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Here is some sample code I was messing around with, when I discovered something I simply don't understand.

This code seems to work

from PyQt4 import QtGui, QtCore
import sys

class Window(QtGui.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

ap = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
var = Window()
var.show()
sys.exit(ap.exec_())

But this causes the window to appear than disappear in quick succession. (Second bottom line altered)

from PyQt4 import QtGui, QtCore
import sys

class Window(QtGui.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

ap = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
Window().show()
sys.exit(ap.exec_())

I simply can not understand why. In all my understanding of python and Qt, I can't fathom why the bottom fails. Is it being garbage collected or something?

Thanks!

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2  
Both of those examples should yell about indentation errors since nothing is in the __init__ bodies. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 10 '13 at 13:51
    
Corrected. My test code had a bunch of other rubbish commented out, with pass suffixed. I deleted it all when making the question for clarity, and forgot to add back in the pass statements –  Anti Earth Jan 10 '13 at 14:03
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2 Answers

In the second version you don't keep a reference to the Window instance, so Python will destroy it after executing that line of code. In the first version you keep a reference in var throught the block of code. Most importantly, var exists while you call ap.exec_().

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Could you elaborate on what's actually happening? What do you mean by 'free'. Why do I see it at all then? –  Anti Earth Jan 10 '13 at 14:25
    
See edited answer. You see it when you call show(), it is destroyed after. –  Janne Karila Jan 11 '13 at 6:40
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It works but instead of writing pass in __init__(), put this:

super(Window, self).__init__()

Your __init__() function is empty.

Here is the full code:

from PyQt4 import QtGui
import sys

class Window(QtGui.QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Window, self).__init__()

ap = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
var = Window()
var.show()
sys.exit(ap.exec_())

I tested this with PySide, should work on PyQt too.

share|improve this answer
    
I absented the superclass constructor because it didn't affect the results. Your 'full code' works because it has a dedicated variable var, not because of the constructors. –  Anti Earth Jan 10 '13 at 20:52
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