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I'm trying to sort an ArrayList of String.

Given:

{A,C,AA,B,CC,BB}

Arraylist.Sort gives:

{A,AA,B,BB,C,CC}

What I need is:

{A,B,C,AA,BB,CC}
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1  
First split the list in seperat list depending on length and then sort them individually. –  Animal Jan 10 '13 at 14:38
1  
Is there a reason for not using a strongly typed List<string>? –  Tim Schmelter Jan 10 '13 at 14:47
    
There are speed advantages of using an ArrayList over a LinkedList. –  rbtLong Jan 10 '13 at 15:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is kind of old school but, I went the IComparer Interface . . .

public class SortAlphabetLength : System.Collections.IComparer
{
    public int Compare(Object x, Object y)
    {
        if (x.ToString().Length == y.ToString().Length)
            return string.Compare(x.ToString(), y.ToString());
        else if (x.ToString().Length > y.ToString().Length)
            return 1;
        else
            return -1;
    }
}

and then test it . . .

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ArrayList values = new ArrayList()
        {
            "A","AA","B","BB","C","CC"
        };

        SortAlphabetLength alphaLen = new SortAlphabetLength();
        values.Sort(alphaLen);

        foreach (string itm in values)
            Console.WriteLine(itm);
    }
}

output:

A
B
C
AA
BB
CC
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1  
Now put a null value in that collection and see what happens. –  Servy Jan 10 '13 at 14:56
    
I'm sorry I didn't see that in the question. I'm just trying to answer the question. Thanks for pointing that out though. –  rbtLong Jan 10 '13 at 14:58
    
If you're writing code to only display the sorted values of that one example than you may as well just print out A, B C, ... It's example input, not the only input he'll ever have to put into it. –  Servy Jan 10 '13 at 14:59
1  
Yeah, robust code that works is overrated; it's much better to use code that's longer, more complex, is harder to understand, and occasionally crashes when there is a sensible course of action. –  Servy Jan 10 '13 at 15:05
1  
thanks, this works great! –  Michiel Blykers Jan 10 '13 at 15:18
ArrayList list = new ArrayList {"A","C","AA","B","CC","BB"};

var sorted = list.Cast<string>()
                 .OrderBy(str => str.Length)
                 .ThenBy(str => str);

//LinqPad specific print call
sorted.Dump();

prints:

A 
B 
C 
AA 
BB 
CC 
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Just note that this doesn't modify the ArrayList, it creates a new sequence of the values from that collection. (It may be acceptable, it's just important to be aware of that.) –  Servy Jan 10 '13 at 14:55
    
yes, sure, good note. Another note that even if you modify list after sorted variable has been declared, but before actually called - than it would contain new element. sorted query is being executed in deferred manner –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 10 '13 at 14:58

It's easier to do this with Linq as so:

string [] list = { "A","C","AA","B","CC","BB"};

var sorted = list.OrderBy(x=>x.Length).ThenBy(x=>x);

Note that the OrderBy method returns a new list. If you want to modify the original, then you need to re-assign it as so:

list = list.OrderBy(x=>x.Length).ThenBy(x=>x).ToArray();
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I would suggest using the ToArray() method (or just using a List<string> instad of an ArrayList) to take advantage of the OrderBy and ThenBy functions. It would look something like this:

list = list.OrderBy(/*Order it by length*/).ThenBy(/*Order alphabetically*/);
share|improve this answer

You could create an IComparable class taking in two Strings and sort them as follows:

if (a.Length == b.Length)
    return String.Compare(a, b);
return a.Length.CompareTo(b.Length);

You may also want to handle null cases.

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