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 #include<stdio.h>
int f(int a)
{
  a > 20? return(10): return(20);
}
int main()
{
    int f(int);
    int b;
    b = f(20);
    printf("%d\n", b);
    return 0;
}

I encountered following errors

expression syntax

function should return a value

parameter a is never used

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4 Answers 4

The conditional operator (?:) in C only takes expressions as operands.

Grammar from C99 §6.5.15:

conditional-expression:
logical-OR-expression
logical-OR-expression ? expression : conditional-expression

A return statement is not an expression, it's a statement. So you cannot put a return statement in the operands.

You can rewrite your function with the following:

return a > 20 ? 10 : 20;

Side note. GCC (and clang, and possibly others) has an extension called statement expressions which you could use in this case to stuff a return statement in the conditional:

a > 20 ? ({return 10;}) : ({return 20;});

(I'm advocating doing that; but there might be uses for it.)

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Two things:

first, the source of your error, you're using the ternary operator wrong:

int f(int a)
{
  return (a > 20? (10): (20));
}

a > b ? x : y is going to return x or y to you, you can either store the value:

result = a > b ? x : y;

or in this case you can make the the return from the function.

Second this line:

int f(int);

is useless and should be removed


The reason that the way you were trying to do it is wrong is because the syntax of ?: expects there to be an expression on the right hand side of the ?

An expression in a programming language is a combination of explicit values, constants, variables, operators, and functions.

return is not an expressions, but a statement (a statement being the smallest standalone element of an imperative programming language.)

Thus you can return an expressions (the result of a ternary operation).

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I agree with you but why can't I use a > 20? return(10): return(20); . In either case one return statement is going to execute. –  Vikash Jan 10 '13 at 14:52
    
@VIK - Check the edit, does that help explain it? –  Mike Jan 10 '13 at 15:03

Correct implementation is as follows:

 #include<stdio.h>
int f(int a)
{
  return a > 20? 10: 20;
}
int main()
{
    int f(int);
    int b;
    b = f(20);
    printf("%d\n", b);
    return 0;
}
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1  
@Mike and Hassan I need the explanation of my question. The correct explanation of error not the correct code. –  Vikash Jan 10 '13 at 14:46
    
Proper explanation is that int f(..) is returning integer however there is not last statement which returns integer. Remember that a > 20? return(10): return(20); is the last statement and it does not start with return keyword. –  Hassan TM Jan 10 '13 at 15:51

OP asked for explanation, not correction. Here is actual answer:

expression syntax: You've tried to use return statement as an argument of ?: operator. This fragment of code was erroneous, so compiler discarded it and continued compilation

function should return a value : because of first error, there was no valid return in function f

parameter a is never used : because of first error, parameter a is not used in function f

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