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I'm trying to remove all empty <p> tags CKEditor is inserting in to a description box but they all seem to vary. The possibilities seem to be:

<p></p>

<p>(WHITESPACE)</p>

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p><br /></p>

<p>(NEWLINE)&nbsp;</p>

<p>(NEWLINE)<br /><br />(NEWLINE)&nbsp;</p>

With these possibilities, there could be any amount of whitespace, &nbsp; and <br /> tags in between the paragraphs, and there could be some of each kind in one paragraph.

I'm also not sure about the <br /> tag, from what I've seen it could be <br />, <br/> or <br>.

I've searched SO for a similar answer but of all the answers I've seen they all seem to cater for just one of these cases, not all at once. I guess in simple terms what I'm asking is, Is there a regular expression I can use to remove all <p> tags from some HTML that don't have any alphanumeric text or symbols/punctuation in them?

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5  
And this is why you don't Parse HTML with Regexes. –  Cerbrus Jan 10 '13 at 15:06
    
Don't use regular expressions to parse HTML. You cannot reliably parse HTML with regular expressions. As soon as the HTML changes from your expectations, your code will be broken. See htmlparsing.com/php.html for examples of how to properly parse HTML with PHP modules. –  Andy Lester Jan 10 '13 at 15:14
2  
So you really think I should use an HTML parser for a string such as '<p>Text</p><p>&nbsp;</p>' - Seems like overkill don't you think? –  Andy Jan 10 '13 at 15:17
1  
This isn't parsing, techincally. And if the desired effect is suitably narrow (i.e. if you expect no understanding, just pattern matching), there's nothing wrong with Regexing a string. Cthulu will stay in his box. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Jan 10 '13 at 15:18
    
I'm curious as to why @AndyLester thinks using DOMDocument to parse a 24 character HTML string is a good idea –  Andy Jan 10 '13 at 15:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Well, in conflict with my suggestion not to parse HTML with regexes, I wrote up a regex to do just that:

"#<p>(\s|&nbsp;|</?\s?br\s?/?>)*</?p>#"

This will match properly for:

<p></p>

<p> </p> <!-- ([space]) -->

<p> </p> <!-- (That's a [tab] character in there -->

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p><br /></p>

<p>
&nbsp;</p>

<p>
<br /><br />
&nbsp;</p>

What it does:

# /                --> Regex start
# <p>              --> match the opening <p> tag
# (                --> group open.
#   \s             --> match any whitespace character (newline, space, tab)
# |                --> or
#   &nbsp;         --> match &nbsp;
# |                --> or
#   </?\s?br\s?/?> --> match the <br> tag
# )*               --> group close, match any number of any of the elements in the group
# </?p>            --> match the closing </p> tag ("/" optional)
# /                --> regex end.
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1  
Two things: use a different deilimiter, your regex will break like crazy because you forgot to escape the forwardslashes. Additionally, the examples in the post don't seem to have terminating tags. I wrote the regex slightly differently: #<p>(\s+|&nbsp;|<br\s*/?>)*(</p>)(?=<p>)# Of course, you can pepper in \s* for all sorts of whitespace concerns. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Jan 10 '13 at 15:17
    
@FrankieTheKneeMan: the examples in the posts seem to use <p> as terminating tags. I'll make the / in </p> optional.Other than that, thanks for the suggestions. I made such a "mess" of the <br> to catch all "possibilities" I've seen used. –  Cerbrus Jan 10 '13 at 15:24
    
Thanks a lot, it did't work with the / as the delimiter but worked perfectly once changed to # –  Andy Jan 10 '13 at 15:24
    
Ah, tagged php. Was used to the JS syntax, but somehow I forgot to escape the /'s in there -.- Thanks for accepting my answer! –  Cerbrus Jan 10 '13 at 15:26
1  
@Cerbrus I forgot all about code blocks, how stupid of me. Cheers :) –  Andy Jan 10 '13 at 15:31

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