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I am using VSTS 2008 + C# + .Net 3.5 + IIS 7.0 + ASP.Net. In my understanding of Forms authentication, a session variable (used for authentication identifier -- i.e. when a user passed authentication, the user will have such a session variable, and the session variable is implemneted as a cookie) is established for authenticated user.

My concern of this mode is, each time user access a page in the web site, the session variable will be transferred to server side. It may be sniffered by hacker, and hacker could use such session variable to pretend to be the end user? Is that a security risk?

If it is a security risk, then we have to use https all the time with Forms authentication?

thanks in advance, George

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've had similar concerns in connection to a request from one of our partners... ( See in details here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1367574/rewriting-urls-using-reverse-proxy )

As it turns out this "legitimate" process is actually using a hacking method called the "middle man". It technically pretends to be the user by keeping the cookie ID in its own session context while dealing with the server and keep a sparate one for the client computer.

So, in theory it could be done and it is a threat. Using SSL is the right way to go in my opinion if the data is in any way sensitive.


Funny enough in this Microsoft Support article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/910443 the phrasing makes you believe that it is actually the same for each request...

Forms authentication cookie is nothing but the container for forms authentication ticket. The ticket is passed as the value of the forms authentication cookie with each request and is used by forms authentication, on the server, to identify an authenticated user.

The cookie could be encrypted, using 3DES encryption. This could be enabled by setting the protection attribute to Validation of the authentication section of the web.config file. Using this setting the server verifies the data on the cookie for each transaction. This adds a little overhead though...

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I don't think it is the same all the time, but I'll look into it. –  G Berdal Sep 15 '09 at 10:51
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If I was Microsoft I would have done it that way. However, it is worth checking because there could be flaws even in the best systems... –  G Berdal Sep 15 '09 at 11:05
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I think I have to agree with others that the best practice is to use SSL if the data is in any way sensitive. SSL has additional values by establishing a much safer way of communication overall. –  G Berdal Sep 15 '09 at 12:13
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It would make no difference if it changed every time, the hacker would just need to use the information before the legitimate user did. –  cjk Sep 15 '09 at 13:26
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Robban mentioned another post above which kind of puts a lid on this can of worms we managed to open... Jeff Prosise is brilliant brain and a recognised author. If he couldn't find an aswer to this, apart from writing his own component then I don't see much chance that I could... However, I'll keep this in mind for future reference and never use Froms authentication without SSL. –  G Berdal Sep 15 '09 at 14:48

The user's session ID is not used as part of the authentication cookie - the authentication cookie, and the session cookie are separate. So if parts of your web site required authentication then the session ID would not be enough to get in.

Having said that, if a hacker is sniffing traffic then they're going to see the authentication cookie as well, and so could recreate both.

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Thanks blowdart, authentication cookie I think you mean ".ASPXAUTH" session cookie? For "user's session ID" you mean? –  George2 Sep 15 '09 at 14:20
    
Actually in this discussion when I say authenticaion session variable, I mean ".ASPXAUTH". Any comments? –  George2 Sep 15 '09 at 14:21
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Why do you think it's a variable? The session cookie, which holds the session identifier is named asp.net_sessionid (although you can change that) It does not hold anything but a guid - no session variables are held in it. The forms auth cookie is more complicated (and signed against tampering). Compromise of a session ID does not authenticate a user, but –  blowdart Sep 15 '09 at 17:10
    
Thanks blowdart, sorry for my bad description. My point is, if https is not used, hacker could sniffer them both (since each of them are transfered in each request to web site). Any comments? BTW: I am using a bad word variable, I should say session cookie. –  George2 Sep 15 '09 at 17:41
    
Yes - this is correct. –  blowdart Sep 15 '09 at 20:13

You could refer to this question for some more information. This is a potential security risk and to provide a truly secure connection you would have to use HTTPS.

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I want to confirm with you each time the same session variable used for Forms authentication will be used each time when used initialize request to a page to the web site? If it is not the same all the time (e.g. each time a random value will be used), I think it is fine. –  George2 Sep 15 '09 at 9:50

Yes, a session id can be stolen by sniffing the traffic, so there is a security risk involved with using the session for identification. It's generally considered to be safe enough for non-critial sites, but if you have a site where the security is critical (banking, et.c) you need to use SSL to be safe enough.

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I want to confirm with you each time the same session variable used for Forms authentication will be used each time when used initialize request to a page to the web site? If it is not the same all the time (e.g. each time a random value will be used), I think it is fine. –  George2 Sep 15 '09 at 9:49
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The session id is an id for the session, not for the user. When you open up the browser and go to the site you get a new session each time. The session lives on the server for 20 minutes (by default) after your last request, after that the session id is no longer valid, and you get a new session when you go to the site. –  Guffa Sep 15 '09 at 11:09
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The hacker would get access to the session information, but not the user information, that is in another cookie, that would also be passed in the browser request and could be sniffed by the hacker. –  cjk Sep 15 '09 at 13:25
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@George2: Yes, if someone is at the right place at the right time with the right equipment, they can sniff the network traffic to pick up the cookie, and spoof a request to impersonate the session. Unless all traffic is encrypted (SSL) there is always a risk for this. –  Guffa Sep 15 '09 at 13:55
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@George2: The browser doesn't scramble or encrypt the cookies, what you send to the browser is exactly what you get back. If the browser would scramble the value, the algorithm would be publically known as the server has to be able read it, so it would be pointless. Also, a scrambled value would be just as easy to pick up and reuse as an unscrambled value, so it wouldn't really add any protection. –  Guffa Sep 15 '09 at 14:55

Yes! Just make sure to add: requireSSL="true" on your web.config forms tag

<authentication mode="Forms">
    <forms loginUrl="~/Account/LogOn" timeout="2880" requireSSL="true" />
  </authentication>

Then you can also use some rewrite to make sure https is used on pages or directories that require authenntication. On MVC you can use the [RequireHttps] filter attribute.

      <rewriteMap name="SSL_Required_pages" defaultValue="">
        <add key="/simulacao-seguro-automovel.aspx" value="/simulacao-seguro-automovel.aspx" />
      </rewriteMap>
      <rule name="Enforce SSL pages">
        <match url="(.*)" />
        <conditions>
          <add input="{SSL_Required_pages:{HTTP_URL}}" pattern="(.+)" />
          <add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="off" />
          <add input="{HTTP_HOST}" pattern="mysite\.com" />
        </conditions>
        <action type="Redirect" url="https://mysite.com/{R:1}" redirectType="Permanent" />
      </rule>
      <rule name="Enforce SSL to secure directories">
        <match url="(.*)" />
        <conditions>
          <add input="{PATH_INFO}" pattern="^/admin/|^/admin|^/fale-conosco/|^/fale-conosco" />
          <add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="off" />
          <add input="{HTTP_HOST}" pattern="mysite\.com" />
        </conditions>
        <action type="Redirect" url="https://www.mysite.com/{R:1}" redirectType="Permanent" />
      </rule>
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