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I am trying to define a chain of commands, which shall be invoked after a breakpoint in gdb:

    break some_function
    commands
       up
       next
       printf "some_string"
       continue
    end

In this case (for example) I want to break at some_function, go up in the stack frame and jump right behind this function via the next command, then print "some_string" (or maybe some variable, which was changed by the function) and then just to continue. But that doesn't work, since gdb will just stop after the next command and wait for the user to input something, disregarding the following commands.

Edit: Ok, the example I gave above did not correctly fit my description. What I really wanted (Thanks goes to the commenter Nikolai, see below) was something like that:

    break some_function
    commands
       finish
       printf "some_string"
       continue
    end

This shall break at 'some_function', execute that function, return and print right after the execution of 'some_function' the string 'some_string'. The problem I had previously with the next command now appears with the finish command: execution will stop after this command and gdb will wait for user input, disregarding the following printf and continue statements. I am sorry, that this question got a bit confusing. I am not happy about it myself, but posting it again, wouldn't be a better solution (since the comments would be lost and it would be cross-posting).

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1  
From what you are saying you want finish, not next (you are already inside the function at that point). –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 10 '13 at 15:34
    
What do you mean with "go up in the stack"? go back by one instruction? –  Davide Berra Jan 10 '13 at 15:34
1  
^^ He means return from function currently being executed –  anishsane Jan 10 '13 at 15:39
    
Yes thank you, that is what I meant to say. –  Lord Bo Jan 10 '13 at 15:45
    
@Nikolai: finish might be what i want instead of up. I thought up would just finish the current function, but i think that was wrong. Thank you for giving me that hint, I will adapt my code from above, to make clearer, what I wanted to say. –  Lord Bo Jan 10 '13 at 15:55

2 Answers 2

Why not simply break at some_function+0x4 or similar offset? To know the correct offset, click next ONCE, & note down the offset...

break some_function+0x4
commands
   up
   printf "some_string"
   continue
end
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Hm, I think this is not what I wanted (and because the Example code did not correctly fit my description, you tried to guess what I wanted - well good guess, but I don't think that is it). I indeed wanted to finish the current function (see Edit of my question), though this was really just meant as an example. The real problem is, that gdb just stops after statements like next and finish. Also I didn't find out, how to let gdb print the current offset. And the main reason, why I try to prevent using offsets or line numbers is, that the code might change, possibly making offsets useless. –  Lord Bo Jan 10 '13 at 16:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, I think I found the answer myself: gdb seems to set internally a breakpoint to the finish and the next command. However, one can define a hook, to overcome breaking at this breakpoint. The best method I think is to generate an own version of the finish (or the next command) to avoid side effects, so this is what one can do:

    define myfinish
      finish
    end

    define hook-myfinish
      printf "some_string"
      continue
    end

    break some_function
    commands
      myfinish
    end

It is advisable to use the silent statement at the beginning of the breaks commands section, to suppress additional output when breaking:

    break some_function
    commands
      silent
      myfinish
    end
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