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I'm creating a template for a custom blog page and am wondering if the following is classed as good HTML5?

Current

<article>
    <header class="clearfix">
        <h1><a href="/link">Title</a></h1>
        <p>Posted on the <time><?=date?></time></p>
    </header>
    <div>
        <p>main content will be here like this ...</p>
        <p>main content will be here like this ...</p>
        <p>main content will be here like this ...</p>
    </div>
    <footer>
        <div class="clearfix">
            <h3>Share this Article</h3>
            <div class="social-button">Facebook</div>
            <div class="social-button">Twitter</div>
            <div class="social-button">Google</div>
        </div>
        <div>
            <h3>Comments</h3>
            <strong>Coming Soon ...</strong>
        </div>
    </footer>
</article>

I've tried to avoid the <div> for the 'main content' but I need to use clearfix and can't seem to get the following working without the div?

article p:last-child:after{
    content: ".";
    display: block;
    clear: both;
    visibility: hidden;
    line-height: 0;
    height: 0;
    }

How negative would the <div> be? maybe I should use a <section> there?

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1 Answer

There is nothing bad in using DIV (as long as it is not used to replace more appropriate semantic element). It does not have semantic sense, it's just a common container for applying styles.

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So div would be the one to use in this scenario? –  Silver89 Jan 10 '13 at 15:55
    
Yes, you are free to use DIV wrappers for styling purposes -- that will not have negative consequences for semantics. Of course, number of such wrappers should be minimal enough to achieve needed styling. –  Marat Tanalin Jan 10 '13 at 15:57
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