Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
data test;
name = 'abcdefgh';
age = 30;
res = name || age;
run;

When I run the above code the variable res holds -> abcdefgh 30

Why the numeric variable age is padding with blanks and then concatenated with the character variable?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When a number and a character are concatenated, the number is converted to a character variable first, then the two character variables are concatenated together. The default format for converting a numeric variable to a character variable is BEST12. (although that can vary based on the format of your numeric variable). put(30,BEST12.) would yield '          30' which is then concatenated to the character variable.

To avoid this, either use strip as Aaron notes, or do your concatenation using CATS (res=cats(name,age);) which automatically strips all variables, or put the numeric variable yourself (and with PUT, you can forcibly left-justify it if you want with the -l option).

share|improve this answer
    
awesome explanation, thanks Joe but could not understand what you meant by 'or put the numeric variable yourself (and with PUT, you can forcibly left-justify it if you want with the -l option).' –  athresh Jan 10 '13 at 16:45
2  
There's also plenty of other variations of the cats function depending on your goal so don't forget to also checkout catt() and catx(). –  Robert Penridge Jan 11 '13 at 0:05
2  
I meant use the put function yourself - SAS is automatically doing so for you when you say res=name||age; but you can easily do res=name||put(age,3. -l);. See sascommunity.org/wiki/Tips:Aligning_with_a_Put_Function for more information on that. –  Joe Jan 11 '13 at 1:20
add comment

Try the below code to concatenate the variables with no space.

data test;
name = 'abcdefgh';
age = 30;
res = name || strip(age);
run;

SAS can be quirky. My best guess as to "why" is that SAS is trying to make the numbers look right-justified for text output listings.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Aaron, but want to know why it pads blanks and then concatenates. –  athresh Jan 10 '13 at 15:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.