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I am using Autofac as the DI container in a project. Now i have started to create unit tests using Moq in it. As the code for business class is already written, so i would like to avoid making major changes in the Business classes. I am facing problem in mocking System.IO.XXX classes (like FileSystemWatcher, Directory, File, StreamReader, etc). Mostly because either they are static classes or they do not have any interfaces.

// This is what one of my business class looks like

internal class SpanFileReader : ISpanFileReader
{
// Some private variables
    private string _filePath;
    private readonly ISpanLogger _spanLogger;

#region Public Properties
    // Prorperties....
#endregion

#region Constructor

public SpanFileReader(string filePath)
{
    _filePath = filePath;
    _spanLogger = IocContainer.Instance.Container.Resolve<ISpanLogger>();
}

#endregion

#region Public Methods

public bool ReadSpanRecords(CancellationToken ct)
{
    try
    {
        if (!VerifySpanFile())
            return false;

        _spanFileLines = new List<string>();

        using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(_filePath))
        {
            while (!streamReader.EndOfStream)
            {
                // some logic
            }
        return true;
        }
    }

    catch (OperationCanceledException operationCanceledException)
    {
        _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
        throw;
    } 
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message);
        throw;
    }
}

public void MoveFileToErrorFolder(string spanFileName)
{
    var spanFilePath = AppConfiguration.SpanFolderPath + spanFileName;
    var errorFilePath = AppConfiguration.SpanErrorFolderPath + spanFileName;
    try
    {
        if (File.Exists(spanFilePath))
        {
            if (!File.Exists(errorFilePath))
            {
                _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
                File.Move(spanFilePath, errorFilePath);
                _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
            }
            else
            {
                File.Delete(spanFilePath);
                _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        _spanLogger.UpdateLog("some message");
        throw ex;
    }
}
}

Now i would like to use the StreamReader() in such a way that i can resolve its instance via some interface(say IStreamReader) using Autofac. So that while writing unit test for SpanFileReader(), i can register IStreamReader's Moq instace in the container and use it instead of the actual instance. I would like to do something similar with the File() class as well, so that i can provide my own moq implementation, which gets called when the SUT (the SpanFileReader instace) is tested. Can someone please suggest a proper way to go about these scenarios.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You mention two problems:

How to mock StreamReader?

  1. Create your IStreamReader interface by copying the methods from StreamReader.
  2. Create a wrapper class StreamReaderWrapper which implements IStreamReader.
  3. In the wrapper's constructor, create a StreamReader.
  4. For each method, forward the calls to the wrapped object.

e.g.

interface IStreamReader
{
    string ReadLine();
    // etc...
}

public class StreamReaderWrapper : IStreamReader
{
    private StreamReader _streamReader;

    public StreamReader(string path)
    {
        _streamReader = new StreamReader(path);
    }

    public string ReadLine()
    {
        return _streamReader.ReadLine();
    }
}

Now replace new StreamReader() in your code, using Autofac (or any factory/IoC container). When testing, return a Mock<IStreamReader>() instead:

using (var streamReader =
    IocContainer.Instance.Container.Resolve<IStreamReaderWrapper>(_filePath))
{
    // ...
}

How to mock File?

Do the same as above, instead creating a IFile and FileWrapper class with no constructor / wrapped object.

Instantiate an instance of this wrapper for use by the whole class, and use this instance whereever you would normally use File.

E.g.

interface IFile
{
    bool Exists(string name);
    // etc...
}

public class FileWrapper : IFile
{
    public bool Exists(string name)
    {
        return File.Exists(string name);
    }
}

then (from your example):

public SpanFileReader(string filePath)
{
    // ...
    _fileWrapper = IocContainer.Instance.Container.Resolve<IFileWrapper>();
}

public void MoveFileToErrorFolder(string spanFileName)
{
    // ...
    if (_fileWrapper.Exists(spanFilePath))
    {
       // ...
    }
}

I find this a very clean pattern once used to it, as all constructor/method signatures are preserved. Having tests which do not touch the file system and are easily mocked is a huge advantage, and much faster too.

An important tip is to avoid adding any logic at all to the wrappers, otherwise they may need testing too (so you'd have to create a wrapper wrapper ...)!

Classes like File can also be accessed via an instance, so you might like to create separate interfaces to keep the instance and static methods wrapper separately (IFileStatics?).

One further idea is to build up a library of various wrapped .Net classes for future use, or create the wrappers automatically with various .NET technologies (Castle Dynamic Proxy for example).

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't it be preferable to just mock the original classes without first creating the interfaces and/or wrappers? I mean, it's not nice when a project ends up with lots of unnecessary boilerplate code like this (like one I know with hundreds of one-implementing-class-only interfaces created just to workaround Moq's deficiencies). Why not use something like MS Fakes instead (available with VS 2012)? –  Rogério Jan 15 '13 at 17:12
    
Agreed is quite a bit of overhead. Yours sounds like a good alternative, why not write it up as a new answer? –  g t Jan 15 '13 at 21:25

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