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Given a sequence of elements and a predicate p, I would like to produce a sequence of sequences such that, in each subsequence, either all elements satisfy p or the sequence has length 1. Additionally, calling .flatten on the result should give me back my original sequence (so no re-ordering of elements).

For instance, given:

val l = List(2, 4, -6, 3, 1, 8, 7, 10, 0)
val p = (i : Int) => i % 2 == 0

I would like magic(l,p) to produce:

List(List(2, 4, -6), List(3), List(1), List(8), List(7), List(10, 0))

I know of .span, but that method stops the first time it encounters a value that doesn't satisfy p and just returns a pair.

Below is a candidate implementation. It does what I want, but, well, makes we want to cry. I would love for someone to come up with something slightly more idiomatic.

def magic[T](elems : Seq[T], p : T=>Boolean) : Seq[Seq[T]] = {
  val loop = elems.foldLeft[(Boolean,Seq[Seq[T]])]((false,Seq.empty)) { (pr,e) =>
    val (lastOK,s) = pr
    if(lastOK && p(e)) {
      (true, s.init :+ (s.last :+ e))
    } else {
      (p(e), s :+ Seq(e))
    }
  }
  loop._2
}

(Note that I do not particularly care about preserving the actual type of the Seq.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would not use foldLeft. It's just a simple recursion of span with a special rule if the head doesn't match the predicate:

def magic[T](elems: Seq[T], p: T => Boolean): Seq[Seq[T]] = 
  elems match {
    case Seq() => Seq()
    case Seq(head, tail @ _*) if !p(head) => Seq(head) +: magic(tail, p)
    case xs => 
      val (prefix, rest) = xs span p
      prefix +: magic(rest, p)
  }

You could also do it tail-recursive, but you need to remember to reverse the output if you're prepending (as is sensible):

def magic[T](elems: Seq[T], p: T => Boolean): Seq[Seq[T]] = {
  def iter(elems: Seq[T], out: Seq[Seq[T]]) : Seq[Seq[T]] = 
    elems match {
      case Seq() => out.reverse
      case Seq(head, tail @ _*) if !p(head) => iter(tail, Seq(head) +: out)
      case xs => 
        val (prefix, rest) = xs span p
        iter(rest, prefix +: out)
    }
  iter(elems, Seq())
}
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This answer is probably the best. (Either method, depending on your performance needs) –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 10 '13 at 21:21
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Another solution using a fold:

def magicFilter[T](seq: Seq[T], p: T => Boolean): Seq[Seq[T]] = {
  val (filtered, current) = (seq foldLeft (Seq[Seq[T]](), Seq[T]())) {
    case ((filtered, current), element) if p(element)       => (filtered, current :+ element)
    case ((filtered, current), element) if !current.isEmpty => (filtered :+ current :+ Seq(element), Seq())
    case ((filtered, current), element)                     => (filtered :+ Seq(element), Seq())
  }
  if (!current.isEmpty) filtered :+ current else filtered
}
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For this task you can use takeWhile and drop combined with a little pattern matching an recursion:

def magic[T](elems : Seq[T], p : T=>Boolean) : Seq[Seq[T]] = {
  def magic(elems: Seq[T], result: Seq[Seq[T]]): Seq[Seq[T]] = elems.takeWhile(p) match {
    // if elems is Nil, we have a result
    case Nil if elems.isEmpty => result

    // if it's not, but we don't get any values from takeWhile, we take a single elem
    case Nil => magic(elems.tail, result :+ Seq(elems.head))

    // takeWhile gave us something, so we add it to the result
    // and drop as many elements from elems, as takeWhile gave us
    case xs => magic(elems.drop(xs.size), result :+ xs)
  }

  magic(elems, Seq())
}
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