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I am drawing two rectangles in html5 canvas element. One of the edges on rectangle a is on the edge of rectangle b.

Rectangle a is green and rectangle b is blue.

The result is that the common edge is neither blue nor green : Its color is some blend of the two.

I tried setting globalCompositeOperation to source over, but it did not help.

enter image description here

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That's because lines are drawed over more than one screen pixel.

The drawing model is based on float coordinates, rounded values being between the screen pixels.

To avoid that blending, always draw lines whose line width is one pixel at coordinates Math.round(x)+0.5.

Here's a related answer with a picture.

And here's some code I made to help drawing thin lines and rectangles :

function drawThinHorizontalLine(c, x1, x2, y) {
    c.lineWidth = 1;
    var adaptedY = Math.floor(y)+0.5;
    c.beginPath();
    c.moveTo(x1, adaptedY);
    c.lineTo(x2, adaptedY);
    c.stroke();
}

function drawThinVerticalLine(c, x, y1, y2) {
    c.lineWidth = 1;
    var adaptedX = Math.floor(x)+0.5;
    c.beginPath();
    c.moveTo(adaptedX, y1);
    c.lineTo(adaptedX, y2);
    c.stroke();
}

function Rect(x,y,w,h){
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.w = w;
    this.h = h;
}

Rect.prototype.drawThin = function(context) {
    drawThinHorizontalLine(context, this.x, this.x+this.w, this.y);
    drawThinHorizontalLine(context, this.x, this.x+this.w, this.y+this.h);
    drawThinVerticalLine(context, this.x, this.y, this.y+this.h);
    drawThinVerticalLine(context, this.x+this.w, this.y, this.y+this.h);
}

Example :

context.strokeColor = 'red';
var r = new Rect(20, 23, 433, 14);
r.drawThin(context);
share|improve this answer
    
What if the rectangles are rotated? – Erik Sapir Jan 10 '13 at 16:36
    
Then, just like the lines, there will be lightly blended with the background but the effect is usually much harder to notice than with horizontal or vertical lines. – Denys Séguret Jan 10 '13 at 16:38

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