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Sorry for the bad headline, but my english isn't that good.
Assume the following code (use LINQPad in Program-mode for testing):

public class BaseClass
{
    protected Settings settings;

    public BaseClass()
    {
        this.settings = new Settings();
    }

    public virtual void PrintSettings()
    {
        var t = settings.GetType();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", t.GetProperties().Select(pi => pi.Name)));
    }

    public class Settings
    {
        public string BaseClassSetting { get { return "BaseClassSetting."; } }
    }
}

Calling "new BaseClass().PrintSettings();" will obviously output "BaseClassSetting" in Console.
Let's derive a class from out BaseClass:

public class InheritedClass : BaseClass
{
    public new class Settings : BaseClass.Settings
    {
        public string InheritedClassSetting { get { return "InheritedClassSetting!"; } }
    }
}

Calling "new InheritedClass().PrintSettings();" will still print "BaseClassSetting" in Console.
The only way to make the code use the "new"ed InheritedClass.Settings is by adding a ctor like

public InheritedClass()
{
    this.settings = new Settings();
}

With this additional ctor, it prints the desired "InheritedClassSetting, BaseClassSetting" to console.
Now the question: is it possible to make the BaseClass-ctor always use the Settings-Class of the instance's object? (without adding the ctor in the derived class)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With bad practices, expect bad workarounds for problems. I wouldn't use the new keyword in general, never mind for a nested class. You can remove the constructor in your inherited class by making your base class accept a generic type inheriting from BaseClass.Settings and with a parameterless constructor. Clearly, it's unreadable.

public class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseClass<T>.Settings, new()
{
    protected Settings settings;

    public BaseClass()
    {
        settings = new T();
    }

    public virtual void PrintSettings()
    {
        var t = settings.GetType();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", t.GetProperties().Select(pi => pi.Name)));
    }

    public class Settings
    {
        public string BaseClassSetting
        {
            get { return "BaseClassSetting."; }
        }
    }
}

public class InheritedClass : BaseClass<InheritedClass.Settings>
{
    public new class Settings : BaseClass<InheritedClass.Settings>.Settings
    {
        public string InheritedClassSetting
        {
            get { return "InheritedClassSetting!"; }
        }
    }
}

Note that on the line:

public new class Settings : BaseClass<InheritedClass.Settings>.Settings

The arguments for the generics don't require you to specify InheritedClass. I've added it because it's pretty confusing already, I didn't want to make it worse.

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Nice, but truly not very readable ;-) What would be your approach for solving this task? –  Sascha Jan 10 '13 at 20:30
    
@Sascha Depends on how you'll use your classes. For example, if inheritance, is not necessary, I'd just use an interface both for what you called BaseClassSettings and InheritedSettings (but not make one derive from the other). Also, I'd avoid declaring them as a nested class, if not strictly necessary. –  Eve Jan 10 '13 at 20:43

No, because you cannot have "virtual types".

There are several ways that you could try to achieve what you are doing here, but all of them would require InheritedClass to explicitly refer to its own version of Settings at some point.

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