Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It was my assumption that the finally block always gets executed as long as the program is running. However, in this console app, the finally block does not seem to get executed.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception();
            }
            finally
            {
                Console.WriteLine("finally");
            }
        }
    }
}

Output

Result

Note: When the exception was thrown, windows askmed me if I wanted to end the appliation, I said 'Yes.'

share|improve this question
4  
Click no and see what happens –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 10 '13 at 16:36
    
run it from the command line instead of within your IDE –  KevinDTimm Jan 10 '13 at 16:37
    
It's look very strange. 'finally' should be wrote exactly after StackTrace. –  Alexander Balte Jan 10 '13 at 16:39
    
there is no catch, the exception is unhandled and the app quits –  Rafa Jan 10 '13 at 16:41
    
Ilya - There is no option to hit no. The other option is to "debug". Kevin - it is running from the command line, not the IDE. –  Anish Jan 10 '13 at 16:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you get the "ConsoleApplication1" has stopped responding, you have two choices.

Windows Error Reporting dialog

If you press cancel, the unhandled exception is allowed to continue until eventually the application is terminated. This allows the finally block to execute. If you do not press cancel then Windows Error Reporting halts the process, collects a minidump and then terminates the application. This means the finally block is not executed.

Alternatively, if you handle the exception in a higher method you will definitely see the finally block. For example:

static void unhandled()
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    finally
    {
        Console.WriteLine("finally");
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += UnhandledExceptionTrapper;
    try
    {
        unhandled();
    }
    catch ( Exception )
    {
        // squash it
    }
}

Always gives the output "finally"

share|improve this answer

It executed actually. Just you didn't notice. Just when you see Windows is checking for a solution to the problem click Cancel and see it.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
What environment are you running in? I am using windows 7, 64. When it asks you "Windows is checking for a solution to the problem.." don't click cancel. Let it do its thing. –  Anish Jan 10 '13 at 16:40
    
I'm using Windows 7-32 bit. Yes you are right. –  Soner Gönül Jan 10 '13 at 16:41

It's possible that you are debugging and when you click no, the execution is being halted by the debugger.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the real reason. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 10 '13 at 16:43

When running from command line. Just when Windows tries to end application gracefully click no or cancel if application is not responding. enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
What environment are you running in? I am using windows 7, 64. When it asks you "Windows is checking for a solution to the problem.." don't click cancel. Let it do its thing. –  Anish Jan 10 '13 at 16:42
    
Then Windows will terminate application without letting it to print to console –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 10 '13 at 16:43

An exception bubbles up the stack until it finds a handler. If it doesn't, the program exits. That's the case in your scenario... there's no handler, so the program exits before it hits the finally block.

share|improve this answer
2  
-1 – finally should be executed before bubbling up the stack – in fact, during the stack unwinding. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 10 '13 at 16:40
    
the entire purpose of finally apparently loses its use if there isnt a catch? thats a new one on me :L –  RhysW Jan 10 '13 at 16:45
    
Sorry, it was a thoughtless answer. –  ktm5124 Jan 10 '13 at 17:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.