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I'm trying to understand what appears to be unexpected behaviour to me:

I have an element with a max-height of 100% inside a container that also uses a max-height but, unexpectedly, the child overflows the parent:

Test case: http://jsfiddle.net/bq4Wu/16/

.container {  
    background: blue; 
    padding: 10px; 
    max-height: 200px; 
    max-width: 200px; 
}

img { 
    display: block;
    max-height: 100%; 
    max-width: 100%; 
}

This is fixed, however, if the parent is given an explicit height:

Test case: http://jsfiddle.net/bq4Wu/17/

.container {  
    height: 200px;
}

Does anyone know why the child would not honour the max-height of its parent in the first example? Why is an explicit height required?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

When you specify a percentage for max-height on a child, it is a percentage of the parent's actual height, not the parent's max-height, oddly enough. The same applies to max-width.

So, when you don't specify an explicit height on the parent, then there's no base height for the child's max-height to be calculated from, so max-height computes to none, allowing the child to be as tall as possible. The only other constraint acting on the child now is the max-width of its parent, and since the image itself is taller than it is wide, it overflows the container's height downwards, in order to maintain its aspect ratio while still being as large as possible overall.

When you do specify an explicit height for the parent, then the child knows it has to be at most 100% of that explicit height. That allows it to be constrained to the parent's height (while still maintaining its aspect ratio).

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This is a useful explanation, especially mixed with my friend's input: "max-height: 100% (child) of max-height: 100% (parent) = 0 - this is why your child isn't honouring its parent value". –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:09
    
I'm not sure which answer to accept - this one answers the 'why'. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:12
    
I only answered the 'why' because I'm not sure what your goal is as it's not explicitly mentioned. Maybe if you elaborate on that, I can answer it. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '13 at 10:14
    
Accepted this as it answers my actual question, thank you. Please note @Daniel's answer below offers a fix. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:15
    
Ah, fair enough. I've given it a vote up. –  BoltClock Jan 11 '13 at 10:16

I played around a little. On a larger image in firefox, I got a good result with using the inherit property value. Will this help you?

.container {
    background: blue;
    padding: 10px;
    max-height: 100px;
    max-width: 100px;
    text-align:center;
}

img {
    max-height: inherit;
    max-width: inherit;
}
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This fixes it! Thanks! –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:10
    
I'm not sure which answer to accept - this one answers the 'fix'. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:14
    
Accepted @BoltClock for answering the why, but thank you for offering a fix. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:15
    
Glad it helped you .. –  Daniel Jan 12 '13 at 19:06
1  
In addition to @BoltClock, my answer is exactly doing what he says. CSS is just telling the computer how to handle an element, but after computations it will have delimited all values down to the basic needed values for rendering, like height, width, color, coordinates, ... The inherit property is telling the img to take the "computed" value of the parent. So you get the computed values for height and width in you max-height and max-width css properties. –  Daniel Jan 12 '13 at 20:07

Maybe someone else can explain the reasons behind your problem but you can solve it by specifying the height of the container and then setting the height of the image to be 100%. It is important that the width of the image appears before the height.

<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            .container {  
                background: blue; 
                padding: 10px;
                height: 100%;
                max-height: 200px; 
                max-width: 300px; 
            }

            .container img {
                width: 100%;
                height: 100%
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class="container">
            <img src="http://placekitten.com/400/500" />
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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If they want the container to become smaller if the image is smaller than 200x200, then yes, it has to be done with min-height/max-height. –  cimmanon Jan 10 '13 at 16:56

The closest I can get to this is this example:

http://jsfiddle.net/YRFJQ/1/

or

.container {  
  background: blue; 
  border: 10px solid blue; 
  max-height: 200px; 
  max-width: 200px; 
  overflow:hidden;
  box-sizing:border-box;
}

img { 
  display: block;
  max-height: 100%; 
  max-width: 100%; 
}

The main problem is that the height takes the percentage of the containers height, so it is looking for an explicitly set height in the parent container, not it's max-height.

The only way round this to some extent I can see is the fiddle above where you can hide the overflow, but then the padding still acts as visible space for the image to flow into, and so replacing with a solid border works instead (and then adding border-box to make it 200px if that's the width you need)

Not sure if this would fit with what you need it for, but the best I can seem to get to.

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Unfortunately cropping the image isn't ideal. Thanks for your input though. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:06

I found a solution here: http://www.sitepoint.com/maintain-image-aspect-ratios-responsive-web-design/

The trick is possible because it exists a relation between WIDTH and PADDING-BOTTOM of an element. So:

parent:

container {
  height: 0;
  padding-bottom: 66%; /* for a 4:3 container size */
  }

child (remove all css related to width, i.e. width:100%):

img {
  max-height: 100%;
  max-width: 100%;
  position: absolute;     
  display:block;
  margin:0 auto; /* center */
  left:0;        /* center */
  right:0;       /* center */
  }
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Your container does not have a height.

Add height: 200px;

to the containers css and the kitty will stay inside.

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Thanks for the input but I did identify this in the OP. –  iamkeir Jan 11 '13 at 10:09

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