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I've this code snippet in Python:

s = socket.create_connection(('192.168.0.111', 123), timeout=2.0)
s.sendall('REQUEST,status,interface'); result = s.recv(1024)

How I can do the "s.recv(1024)" in Delphi using TIdTCPClient from Indy components? Server returns a string without any terminator, so ReadLn doesn't work.

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How do you know how much to read? Is it always 1024 bytes? –  Steve Mayne Jan 10 '13 at 18:16
    
I know it's less than 1024 bytes. –  Harriv Jan 10 '13 at 18:35
    
Steve's question still stands. you have to know how the data is being terminated in order to know how to read it properly. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 11 '13 at 2:22
    
It's not terminated. There are limited number of answers server can send. –  Harriv Jan 11 '13 at 7:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In Python, recv(1024) simply reads whatever is available on the socket, up to 1024 bytes max. It is possible to do the same thing with TIdTCPClient (see below), but it is not the best way to handle socket programming in general. You really need to know how the server is actually terminating the data. Does it close its end of the connection after sending the data? If not, does it expect you to simply read whatever bytes are available regardless of the actual length? And if so, how does it expect you to handle TCP packet fragmentation (TCP/IP can separate transmitted data into multiple packets, and may receive data as multiple packets even if they were not sent as such)? Does it expect you to keep reading until some timeout occurs, indicating no more data is being sent?

It makes a big difference in how you write code to handle the reading properly. For example:

IdTCPClient1.Host := '192.168.0.111';
IdTCPClient1.Port := 123;
IdTCPClient1.ConnectTimeout := 2000;
IdTCPClient1.Connect;
try
  IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.Write('REQUEST, status, interface');

  // wait for a disconnect then return everything that was received
  Result := IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.AllData;
finally
  IdTCPClient1.Disconnect;
end;

Vs:

IdTCPClient1.Host := '192.168.0.111';
IdTCPClient1.Port := 123;
IdTCPClient1.ConnectTimeout := 2000;
IdTCPClient1.Connect;
try
  IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.Write('REQUEST, status, interface');

  // set the max number of bytes to read at one time
  IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.RecvBufferSize := 1024;

  // read whatever is currently in the socket's receive buffer, up to RecvBufferSize number of bytes
  IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.CheckForDataOnSource;

  // return whatever was actually read
  Result := IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.InputBufferAsString;
finally
  IdTCPClient1.Disconnect;
end;

Vs:

IdTCPClient1.Host := '192.168.0.111';
IdTCPClient1.Port := 123;
IdTCPClient1.ConnectTimeout := 2000;
IdTCPClient1.Connect;
try
  IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.Write('REQUEST, status, interface');

  // keep reading until 5s of idleness elapses
  repeat until not IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.CheckForDataOnSource(5000);

  // return whatever was actually read
  Result := IdTCPClient1.IOHandler.InputBufferAsString;
finally
  IdTCPClient1.Disconnect;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
The second version is what I need, thanks. –  Harriv Jan 11 '13 at 7:30

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