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We have a library function that goes like this:

class function TFileUtils.ReadTextStream(const AStream: TStream): string;
var
  StringStream: TStringStream;
begin
  StringStream := TStringStream.Create('', TEncoding.Unicode);
  try
    // This is WRONG since CopyFrom might rewind the stream (see Remys comment)
    StringStream.CopyFrom(AStream, AStream.Size - AStream.Position);
    Result := StringStream.DataString;
  finally
    StringStream.Free;
  end;
end;

When I check the string that is returned by the function the first Char is the (little-endian) BOM.

Why doesn't TStringStream ignore the BOM?

Is there a better way to do this? I don't need backwards compatibility with older Delphi versions, a working solution for XE2 would be fine.

share|improve this question
2  
I don't see that there's anything wrong. TStream.CopyFrom simply copies all the data it's told to. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 10 '13 at 20:37
    
@RobKennedy You're right, but I would have expected the DataString function to return a string without the BOM. I changed the question title a little bit. –  Jens Mühlenhoff Jan 11 '13 at 9:00
1  
FYI, CopyFrom() resets the stream's Position back to 0 and reads the entire stream if the second parameter is 0. If the Position is at the end of the stream then you might end up returning something you are not expecting. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 11 '13 at 16:32
    
@RemyLebeau Thanks, I have edited the code sample and am not using it anymore anyway. –  Jens Mühlenhoff Jan 11 '13 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The BOM has to be coming from the source TStream, as TStringStream does not write a BOM. If you want to ignore the BOM if it is present in the source, you have to do it manually before then copying the data, eg:

class function TFileUtils.ReadTextStream(const AStream: TStream): string;
var
  StreamPos, StreamSize: Int64;
  Buf: TBytes;
  NumBytes: Integer;
  Encoding: TEncoding;
begin
  Result := '';

  StreamPos := AStream.Position;
  StreamSize := AStream.Size - StreamPos;

  // Anything available to read?
  if StreamSize < 1 then Exit;

  // Read the first few bytes from the stream...
  SetLength(Buf, 4);
  NumBytes := AStream.Read(Buf[0], Length(Buf));
  if NumBytes < 1 then Exit;
  Inc(StreamPos, NumBytes);
  Dec(StreamSize, NumBytes);

  // Detect the BOM. If you know for a fact what the TStream data is encoded as, you can assign the Encoding variable to the appropriate TEncoding object and GetBufferEncoding() will check for that encoding's BOM only...
  SetLength(Buf, NumBytes);
  Encoding := nil;
  Dec(NumBytes, TEncoding.GetBufferEncoding(Buf, Encoding));

  // If any non-BOM bytes were read than rewind the stream back to that position...
  if NumBytes > 0 then
  begin
    AStream.Seek(-NumBytes, soCurrent);
    Dec(StreamPos, NumBytes);
    Inc(StreamSize, NumBytes);
  end else
  begin
    // Anything left to read after the BOM?
    if StreamSize < 1 then Exit;
  end;

  // Now read and decode whatever is left in the stream...
  StringStream := TStringStream.Create('', Encoding);
  try
    StringStream.CopyFrom(AStream, StreamSize);
    Result := StringStream.DataString;
  finally
    StringStream.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I've accepted this answer, because it explains what's going on. Hower I will use the TStreamReader solution since it's the shortest and apparently also the fastest method to get what I want. –  Jens Mühlenhoff Jan 11 '13 at 9:53

Apparently TStreamReader doesn't suffer from the same problem:

var
  StreamReader: TStreamReader;
begin
  StreamReader := TStreamReader.Create(AStream);
  try
    Result := StreamReader.ReadToEnd;
  finally
    StreamReader.Free;
  end;
end;

TStringList also works (thanks whosrdaddy):

var
  Strings: TStringList;
begin
  Strings := TStringList.Create;
  try
    Strings.LoadFromStream(AStream);
    Result := Strings.Text;
  finally
    Strings.Free;
  end;
end;

I also measured both methods and TStreamReader seems to be about twice as fast.

share|improve this answer
1  
The same goes for TStrings (docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/XE3/en/…), maybe you can add this to your answer. –  whosrdaddy Jan 10 '13 at 18:49
2  
Beware that after loading the stream into a string list and re-joining the list into a single string, the line endings in the result might differ from the original source. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 10 '13 at 20:39
2  
TStreamReader's constructor has an optional DetectBOM parameter. Your example is setting that parameter to True, that is why it is not suffering from the original problem. –  Remy Lebeau Jan 11 '13 at 1:16

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