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I was reading a file capability.h given here
I am not clear as how can symbols | ~ & and &~ be used in function calls what are they doing in

Use of | in following function call:

static inline kernel_cap_t cap_combine(const kernel_cap_t a,
                                       const kernel_cap_t b)
{
        kernel_cap_t dest;
        CAP_BOP_ALL(dest, a, b, |);
        return dest;
}

Use of & in following system call:

static inline kernel_cap_t cap_intersect(const kernel_cap_t a,
                                         const kernel_cap_t b)
{
        kernel_cap_t dest;
        CAP_BOP_ALL(dest, a, b, &);
        return dest;
}

Use of &~ in following function:

static inline kernel_cap_t cap_drop(const kernel_cap_t a,
                                    const kernel_cap_t drop)
{
        kernel_cap_t dest;
        CAP_BOP_ALL(dest, a, drop, &~);
        return dest;
}

Use of ~ in following function:

static inline kernel_cap_t cap_invert(const kernel_cap_t c)
{
        kernel_cap_t dest;
        CAP_UOP_ALL(dest, c, ~);
        return dest;
}
share|improve this question
1  
They're used in the context of a macro, so when that macro is expanded, the "passed-in" operator is just present in some expression. – Rob I Jan 10 '13 at 18:17
    
ok I got you on it is defined as #define CAP_BOP_ALL(c, a, b, OP) but then what does OP means or how can it be used? – Registered User Jan 10 '13 at 18:19
2  
It depends on the definition of CAP_BOP_ALL - for example, it could expand to c = a OP b, with OP substituted with |, &, etc, to have different effects. – Rob I Jan 10 '13 at 18:47
up vote 6 down vote accepted

For example CAP_BOP_ALL is defined as

#define CAP_BOP_ALL(c, a, b, OP)                                    \
do {                                                                \
        unsigned __capi;                                            \
        CAP_FOR_EACH_U32(__capi) {                                  \
                c.cap[__capi] = a.cap[__capi] OP b.cap[__capi];     \
        }                                                           \
} while (0)

so the "expression"

CAP_BOP_ALL(dest, a, b, |);

expands to

do {
        unsigned __capi;
        for (__capi = 0; __capi < _KERNEL_CAPABILITY_U32S; ++__capi) {
                dest.cap[__capi] = a.cap[__capi] | b.cap[__capi];
        }
} while (0);

. Even though the original expression doesn't look like correct C, it is because the C parser only gets it when the preprocessor is done and made it look like the latter expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm the example you gave is probably expanding CAP_FOR_EACH_U32 are you sure if it is expanding CAP_BOP_ALL in case yes can you give me a link to some thing to read because I came across such kind of macros for the first time – Registered User Jan 10 '13 at 18:33
    
Ok I got you yes they are macros getting expanded – Registered User Jan 10 '13 at 18:37
    
Registered User: CAP_FOR_EACH_U32(__capi) is #defined as for (__capi = 0; __capi < _KERNEL_CAPABILITY_U32S; ++__capi) (line 51 of capability.h). BTW, CAP_BOP_ALL is #defined in line 97. – Uwe Kleine-König Jan 10 '13 at 19:19

Obviously, these CAP_ things aren't functions, but rather preprocessor macros. And you can pass any preprocessing tokens to macros.

share|improve this answer
    
so what does some thing like | ,& or &~ or ~ stands for in a preprocessor macro – Registered User Jan 10 '13 at 18:21

Those are almost certainly preprocessor macros, for which the arguments are raw tokens, not parsed as operators.

share|improve this answer
    
so what does some thing like | ,& or &~ or ~ stands for in a preprocessor macro can you give me some link that can explain me its use as given in question – Registered User Jan 10 '13 at 18:20
1  
Impossible to say for sure without looking at macro definitions. For example, you can #define MY_MACRO(op) (1 op 2) and use MY_MACRO(+) and MY_MACRO(&~). Here it's just a piece of source code substituted into an expression. CAP_ probably has something similar but more sensible. – Anton Kovalenko Jan 10 '13 at 18:23

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